Bismarck, the Man and the Statesman: Being the Reflections and Reminiscences of Otto, Prince Von Bismarck, Volume 1

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Harper & brothers, 1898 - Europe
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Page 221 - ... of plenary power made up to the present time is not convenient, and that a head responsible to himself alone is needed by the state. From all these considerations, the King gives orders to the next heir to the throne to do what is laid down in the constitution of the country to meet such a case. The directions of the constitution which, precisely on this point, have been drawn up in the interests of the monarchy, will then be brought into operation, and the vote of the Diet which, though superfluous...
Page 323 - The preponderance of dynastic attachment, and the use of a dynasty as the indispensable cement to hold together a definite portion of the nation calling itself by the name of the dynasty, is a specific peculiarity of the German Empire.
Page 240 - Dekabrists onward, and through all succeeding experiences. How he felt as regards his position towards his subjects is shown by a circumstance which Frederick William IV. himself related to me. The Emperor Nicholas asked him to send two corporals of the Prussian guard for the purpose of performing a certain massage treatment prescribed by the doctors, which was to be carried out on the back of the patient while he lay on his stomach. He added: ' I can always manage my Russians when I can look them...
Page 163 - Prince, handsome and cool in his black uniform, conversed with me courteously, but in his manner there was a kind of malevolent curiosity from which I concluded that my anti-occidental influence upon the King was not unknown to him. In accordance with the mode of thought...
Page 313 - ... contest which could only be settled by blood and iron. In order to secure our success in this, the deputies must place the greatest possible weight of blood and iron in the hands of the King of Prussia, in order that according to his judgment he might throw it into one scale or the other. I had already given expression to the same idea in the House of Deputies in 1849, in answer to Schramm on the occasion of an amnesty debate. ' Roon, who was present, expressed his dissatisfaction with my remarks...
Page 96 - Bismarck himself, indeed, gave another reason for his exclusion from office. " The King looked upon me as an egg which he had laid and hatched out himself, and in cases of difference of opinion would have always had the feeling that the egg wanted to be cleverer than the hen.
Page 316 - This set him on a course of thought which was quite familiar to him; and in a few minutes he was restored to the confidence which he had lost at Baden, and even recovered his cheerfulness. To give up his life for King and Fatherland was the duty of an officer; still more that of a King, as the first officer in the land.
Page 164 - Junker' policy. It was not to be wondered at that this view of the Prince's and of the then partisans of the Duke of Coburg had descended to the Prince's daughter, who shortly after became our Crown Princess. Even soon after her arrival in Germany, in February 1858, I became convinced, through members of the royal house and from my own observations, that the Princess was prejudiced against me personally. The fact itself did not surprise me so much as the form...
Page 346 - Austria is confronted by no such difficulties as for us are indissolubly bound up with the re-establishment of Polish independence, difficulties incident to the adjustment of the respective claims of Poles and Germans in Poland and West Prussia, and to the situation of East Prussia. Our geographical position, and the intermixture of both nationalities in the eastern provinces, including Silesia, compel us to retard, as far as possible, the opening of the Polish question, and even in 1863 made it...
Page 170 - I believe he is happy when he is able to enjoy anything good at his ease; his understanding is overrated at the expense of his heart; he is at bottom good-natured and has an unusual measure of gratitude for every service rendered him." The King laughed at this in a manner that vexed me and led me to ask whether I might be permitted to guess his Majesty's present thoughts. The King consented, and I said: "General von Canitz used to lecture to the young officers in the military school on the campaigns...