A history of Jamaica

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Contents

I
III
5
IV
15
V
25
VI
72
VII
81
IX
87
X
95
XV
197
XVI
297
XVII
308
XVIII
354
XIX
373
XX
383
XXI
396
XXII
424

XI
142
XII
153
XIV
178
XXIII
435
XXV
448
XXVII
472

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Page 242 - 2. That, through a determined and persevering, but at the same time judicious and temperate enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of His Majesty's subjects.
Page 134 - We cannot allow the colonies to check, or discourage in any degree, a traffic so beneficial to the nation.
Page 461 - The evidence, oral and documentary, appears to us to be wholly insufficient to establish the charge upon which the prisoner took his trial.
Page 241 - That the state of slavery is repugnant to the principles of the British constitution, and of the Christian religion, and that it ought to be abolished gradually throughout the British colonies, with as much expedition as may be found consistent with a due regard to the wellbeing of the parties concerned.
Page 241 - That the State of Slavery is repugnant to the principles of the British Constitution, and of the Christian Religion ; and that it ought to be gradually abolished throughout the British Colonies, with as much expedition as may be found consistent with a due regard to the well-being of the parties concerned.
Page 204 - Species ;" and in 1787 the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade was formed.
Page 32 - We have done the like to the Windward English Islands ; and both in England and Scotland and Ireland, you will have what men and women we can well transport.
Page 377 - ... such as may be necessary to preserve inviolate the faith of the island with the public creditor...
Page 203 - On that day, the master of the ship called together a few of the officers, and stated to them, that if the sick slaves died a natural death, the loss would fall on the owners of the ship ; but if they were thrown alive into the sea on any sufficient pretext of necessity for the safety of the ship, it would be the loss of the underwriters...
Page 161 - Jewish (economics, these differ'd little from the wife, except in some outward ceremonies and stipulations, but agreed with her in all the true essences of marriage, and gave themselves up to the husband (for so he is called), with faith plighted, with sentiments, and with affection. Such a one the...

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