The Public Rights in Boston Common: Being the Report of a Committee of Citizens

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Press of Rockwell and Churchill, 1877 - Boston (Mass.) - 64 pages
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Page 35 - Fulton, whose memory will dwell in the grateful recollections of posterity, when the titled and laurelled destroyers of mankind shall be remembered only with detestation. Mechanics of America, respect your calling, respect yourselves. The cause of human improvement has no firmer or more powerful friends. In the great Temple of Nature, whose foundation is the earth, — whose pillars are the eternal hills, — whose roof is the star-lit sky, — whose organ-tones are the whispering breeze and the...
Page vi - Sts. c. 54, 13, providing that " no highway, town way, street, turnpike, canal, railroad, or street railway shall be laid out or constructed over a common or park dedicated to the use of the public, or appropriated to such use without interruption for the period of twenty years . . . unless with the consent of the inhabitants of the city or town, after public notice, given in the manner provided in cases of the location and alteration of highways.
Page 34 - Corporation shall only be employed for the purpose of relieving the distresses of unfortunate Mechanics, and their families, to promote inventions and improvements in the Mechanic Arts, by granting premiums for said inventions and improvements, and to assist young Mechanics, with loans of money.
Page 64 - Arlington and Charles Streets, except such as are expedient for horticultural purposes: provided, that nothing herein contained shall render it unlawful to erect a city hall on the public garden.
Page 35 - ... be remembered only with detestation. — Mechanics of America, respect your calling, respect yourselves. The cause of human improvement has no firmer or more powerful friends. In the great Temple of Nature, whose foundation is the earth, — whose pillars are the eternal hills, — whose roof is the star-lit sky, — whose organ-tones are the whispering breeze and the sounding storm, — whose architect is God, — there is no ministry more sacred than that of the intelligent mechanic ! ORDER...
Page 50 - Reserving, however, sixty feet in width across the southerly end of said piece of land, for a road from Pleasant Street to the channel." The word used in making this reservation is simply " road " ; not " way " or
Page 52 - SECT. 39. The city council shall have the care and superintendence of the public buildings, and the care, custody, and management of all the property of the city, with power to lease or sell the same, except the Common and Faneuil Hall.
Page 60 - Sweden, would before the beginning of a battle kneel down devoutly, at the head of his army, and pray to God, the giver of victory, to give them success against their enemies, which commonly was the event ; and that he was as careful also to return thanks to God for the victory. But solemn prayer in the field upon a day of training, I never knew but in New England, where it seems it is a common custom. About three of the clock, both our exercise and prayers being over, we had a very noble dinner,...
Page 62 - were also authorized to lay out a road sixty feet wide from Pleasant street along the easterly side of these lands over the marsh towards Beacon street, in order to meet a road that might be opened from West Boston Bridge.
Page 50 - ... of them, erected upon the granted land ; then that the heads of the ropewalks shall be placed upon the southerly ends of the respective lots ; then that the grantees shall erect, within two years, a sufficient sea-wall along the whole westerly side of these lands. The votes further provide, that " nothing in the foregoing grants shall be considered as conveying to the. said grantees, or either of them, any right of passage in any direction across the Common, to or from the said granted lands...

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