Welcome to the Monkey House

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Random House Publishing Group, Dec 18, 2007 - Fiction - 352 pages
55 Reviews
Welcome to the Monkey House is a collection of Kurt Vonnegut’s shorter works. Originally printed in publications as diverse as The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and The Atlantic Monthly, these superb stories share Vonnegut’s audacious sense of humor and extraordinary range of creative vision.
 


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Hagelstein - LibraryThing

A collection of Vonnegut's short stories published in the 1950s and 60s. All are excellent, most masterful. What's striking about many is the basically optimistic post-war view. in "Adam" Holocaust ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ecataldi - LibraryThing

Every time I re-read this I fall in love with it all over again. Honestly one of my favorite Vonnegut books, his short stories are masterful and stick with you. Each one of the twenty five short ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

WHERE I LIVE
5
HARRISON BERGERON
11
WHO AM I THIS TIME?
19
WELCOME TO THE MONKEY HOUSE
34
LONG WALK TO FOREVER
55
THE FOSTER PORTFOLIO
63
MISS TEMPTATION
79
ALL THE KINGS HORSES
94
DP
165
REPORT ON THE BARNHOUSE EFFECT
177
THE EUPHIO QUESTION
193
GO BACK TO YOUR PRECIOUS WIFE AND SON
210
DEER IN THE WORKS
226
THE LIE
242
UNREADY TO WEAR
258
THE KID NOBODY COULD HANDLE
274

TOM EDISONS SHAGGY DOG
115
NEW DICTIONARY
122
NEXT DOOR
128
MORE STATELY MANSIONS
138
THE HYANNIS PORT STORY
151
THE MANNED MISSILES
288
EPICAC
301
ADAM
310
TOMORROW AND TOMORROW AND TOMORROW
319
Copyright

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Page 11 - The year was 2081, and everybody was finally equal. They weren't only equal before God and the law. They were equal every which way. Nobody was smarter than anybody else. Nobody was better looking than anybody else. Nobody was stronger or quicker than anybody else. All this equality was due to the 2iith, 212th, and 213th Amendments to the Constitution, and to the unceasing vigilance of agents of the United States Handicapper General.
Page 16 - Ballerinas, technicians, musicians and announcers cowered on their knees before him, expecting to die. "I am the Emperor!" cried Harrison. "Do you hear? I am the Emperor! Everybody must do what I say at once!" He stamped his foot and the studio shook. "Even as I stand here," he bellowed, "crippled, hobbled, sickened — I am a greater ruler than any man who ever lived! Now watch me become what I can become!" Harrison tore the straps of his handicap harness like wet tissue paper, tore straps guaranteed...
Page 15 - A police photograph of Harrison Bergeron was flashed on the screen upside down, then sideways, upside down again, then right side up. The picture showed the full length of Harrison against a background calibrated in feet and inches. He was exactly seven feet tall. The rest of Harrison's appearance was Halloween and hardware. Nobody had ever borne heavier handicaps. He had outgrown hindrances faster than the HG men could think them up. Instead of a little ear radio for a mental handicap, he wore a...
Page 14 - Reckon it'd fall all apart," said Hazel. "What would?" said George blankly. "Society," said Hazel uncertainly. "Wasn't that what you just said?" "Who knows?" said George. The television program was suddenly interrupted for a news bulletin. It wasn't clear at first as to what the bulletin was about, since the announcer, like all announcers, had a serious speech impediment. For about half a minute, and in a state of high excitement, the announcer tried to say, "Ladies and gentlemen — " He finally...
Page 11 - Hazel had a perfectly average intelligence, which meant she couldn't think about anything except in short bursts. And George, while his intelligence was way above normal, had a little mental handicap radio in his ear. He was required by law to wear it at all times. It was tuned to a government transmitter. Every twenty seconds or so, the transmitter would send out some sharp noise to keep people like George from taking unfair advantage of their brains.

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About the author (2007)

Kurt Vonnegut was a master of contemporary American literature. His black humor, satiric voice, and incomparable imagination first captured America’s attention in The Sirens of Titan in 1959 and established him, in the words of The New York Times, as “a true artist” with the publication of Cat’s Cradle in 1963. He was, as Graham Greene declared, “one of the best living American writers.” Mr. Vonnegut passed away in April 2007.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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