Empire and Elites after the Muslim Conquest: The Transformation of Northern Mesopotamia

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Dec 21, 2000 - History - 206 pages
0 Reviews
The study of early Islamic historical tradition has flourished with the emergence of an innovative scholarship no longer dependent on more traditional narratival approaches. Chase Robinson's book, first published in 2000, takes full account of the research available and interweaves history and historiography to interpret the political, social and economic transformations in the Mesopotamian region after the Islamic conquests. Using Arabic and Syriac sources to elaborate his argument, the author focuses on the Muslim and Christian élites, demonstrating that the immediate effects of the conquests were in fact modest ones. Significant social change took place only at the end of the seventh century with the imposition of Marwanid rule. Even then, the author argues, social power was diffused in the hands of local élites. This is a sophisticated study in a burgeoning field in Islamic studies.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

ONE Conquest history and its uses
1
TWO The seventhcentury Jazira
33
the birth of Mosul
63
the shaharija
90
Jaziran Kharijism
109
the Abbasid Revolution in Mosul I
127
the Abbasid Revolution in Mosul II
147
Conclusion
165
Bibliography
172
Index
200
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Chase F. Robinson is Lecturer in Islamic History at the University of Oxford.

Bibliographic information