Essential CVS

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"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", Nov 20, 2006 - Computers - 430 pages
3 Reviews

This easy-to-follow reference shows a variety of professionals how to use the Concurrent Versions System (CVS), the open source tool that lets you manage versions of anything stored in files. Ideal for software developers tracking different versions of the same code, this new edition has been expanded to explain common usages of CVS for system administrators, project managers, software architects, user-interface (UI) specialists, graphic designers and others.

Current for version 1.12, Essential CVS, 2nd Edition offers an overview of CVS, explains the core concepts, and describes the commands that most people use on a day-to-day basis. For those who need to get up to speed rapidly, the book's Quickstart Guide shows you how to build and use a basic CVS repository with the default settings and a minimum of extras. You'll also find:

  • A full command reference that details all aspects of customizing CVS for automation, logging, branching, merging documents, and creating alerts
  • Examples and descriptions of the most commonly used options for each command
  • Why and when to tag or branch your project, tagging before releases, and using branching to create a bugfix version of a project
  • Details on the systems used in CVS to permit multiple developers to work on the same project without loss of data

An entire section devoted to document version management and project management includes ways to import and export projects, work with remote repositories, and shows how to fix things that can go wrong when using CVS. You'll find more screenshots in this edition as well as examples of using graphical CVS clients to run CVS commands. Essential CVS also includes a FAQ that answers common queries in the CVS mailing list to get you up and running with this system quickly and painlessly.

 

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Excelent CVS configuration Guide !!!

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kg4giy - LibraryThing

A good book for CVS users and administrators but in need of meat for basic and advanced administration. Read full review

Contents

Part I
1
What Is CVS?
3
CVS Quickstart Guide
13
Part II
41
Basic Use of CVS
43
Tagging and Branching
86
Multiple Users
123
Part III
145
Troubleshooting
256
Part IV
267
Command Reference
269
Miscellaneous Topics Reference
322
Part V
355
Clients and Operating Systems
357
Administrators Tools
376
Frequently Asked Questions
387

Repository Management
147
Project Management
196
Remote Repositories
233

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 15 - Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree... Done The following NEW packages will be installed: cvs 0 upgraded, 1 newly installed, 0 to remove and 30 not upgraded.
Page 12 - Usage: cvs [cvs-options] command [command-options-and-arguments] where cvs-options are -q, -n, etc. (specify --help-options for a list of options) where command is add, admin, etc. (specify --help-commands for a list of commands or --help-synonyms for a list of command synonyms) where command-options-and-arguments depend on the specific command (specify -H followed by a command name for command-specific help) Specify --help to receive this message The Concurrent Versions System (CVS) is a tool for...
Page 16 - installonlyn" plugin Setting up Install Process Setting up repositories Reading repository metadata in from local files Parsing package install arguments Resolving Dependencies --> Populating transaction set with selected packages. Please wait. > Downloading header for wireshark-gnome to pack into transaction set.
Page 35 - Adding files $ touch file3 $ cvs add file3 cvs add: scheduling file " files' for addition cvs add: use 'cvs commit' to add this file permanently $ cvs commit Log message editor opens...

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About the author (2006)

Vesperman has been working with computers since the late 1980s. She currently works as a contractor for Cybersource, a programming, system administration, and training company in Melbourne, Australia.

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