The Middle Kingdom: A Survey of The... Chinese Empire and Its Inhabitants, Volume 1

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Wiley & Putnam, 1848 - China
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Page 304 - From the impracticability of providing for every possible contingency," says the 44th section of the Penal Code, " there may be cases to which no laws or statutes are precisely applicable ; such cases may then be determined by an accurate comparison with others, which are already provided for, and which approach most nearly to those under investigation, in order to ascertain afterwards to what extent an aggravation or mitigation of the punishment would be equitable. A provisional sentence conformable...
Page 40 - Mongols, but are given to agriculture or hunting, according to the part of their country they inhabit. They are of a lighter complexion and slightly heavier build than the Chinese, have the same conformation of the eyelids, but rather more beard, and their countenances present greater intellectual capacity. Literary pursuits are more esteemed by them than by Mongolians, and they are less under the priesthood.
Page 269 - The first is the only authentic species, according to the Chinese. It has the head of a camel, the horns of a deer, eyes of a rabbit, ears of a cow, neck of a snake, belly of a frog, scales of a carp. claws of a hawk, and palm of a tiger. On each side of the mouth are whiskers, and its beard contains a bright pearl. The breath is sometimes changed into water and sometimes into fire, and its voice is like the jingling of copper pans.
Page 28 - ... great trade. This great work is seen scaling the precipices and topping the craggy hills of the country, which have along this coast a most desolate appearance. Some of the party who went in-shore in the steamer to within two miles...
Page 308 - When we turn from the ravings of the Zendavesta, or the Puranas, to the tone of sense and of business of this Chinese collection, we seem to be passing from darkness to light — from the drivellings of dotage to the exercise of an improved understanding...
Page 538 - I wish to have you go with me, and fully equalize the empire: what do you think of this ?' The lad replied, ' The empire cannot be equalized ; here are high hills, there are lakes and rivers ; either there are princes and nobles, or there are slaves and servants. If the high hills be leveled, the birds and beasts will have no resort; if the rivers and lakes be filled up, the fishes and the turtles will have nowhere to go ; do away with kings and nobles, and the common people will have much dispute...
Page 423 - for the purposes of education among the ancients, villages had their schools, districts their academies, departments their colleges, and principalities their universities.
Page 279 - ... hold the pencils ; the rule to measure lengths, the cup to gauge quantities, and the bucket to draw water ; the bellows to blow the fire, and the bottle to retain the match ; the bird-cage and crab-net, the fish-pole and sumpitan, the water-wheel and eave-duct, wheel-barrow and hand-cart, etc. etc., are one and all furnished or completed by this magnificent grass, whose graceful beauty when growing is comparable to its varied usefulness when cut down.
Page 268 - ... the neck of a snake, the tail of a fish, the forehead of a crane, the crown of a mandarin drake, the stripes of a dragon, and the vaulted back of a tortoise. The feathers have five...
Page 321 - In the first month of the present winter occurs the sixtieth anniversary of her majesty's sacred natal day. At the opening of the happy period, the sun and moon shed their united genial influences on it. When commencing anew the revolution of the sexagenary cycle, the honor thereof adds increase to her felicity. Looking VOL.