One of Ours

Front Cover
General Books LLC, 2010 - Fiction - 214 pages
Excerpt: ... never saw you so worked up." "Your father is worked up, too, or he would never have sent that telegram." Mrs. Wheeler reluctantly took up her workbasket, and the boys talked with their old, easy friendliness. When Ernest left, Claude walked as far as the Yoeders' place with him, and came back across the snow-drifted fields, under the frosty brilliance of the winter stars. As he looked up at them, he felt more than ever that they must have something to do with the fate of nations, and with the incomprehensible things that were happening in the world. In the ordered universe there must be some mind that read the riddle of this one unhappy planet, that knew what was forming in the dark eclipse of this hour. A question hung in the air; over all this quiet land about him, over him, over his mother, even. He was afraid for his country, as he had been that night on the State House steps in Denver, when this war was undreamed of, hidden in the womb of time. Claude and his mother had not long to wait. Three days later they knew that the German ambassador had been dismissed, and the American ambassador recalled from Berlin. To older men these events were subjects to think and converse about; but to boys like Claude they were life and death, predestination. VII One stormy morning Claude was driving the big wagon to town to get a load of lumber. The roads were beginning to thaw out, and the country was black and dirty looking. Here and there on the dark mud, grey snow crusts lingered, perforated like honeycomb, with wet weedstalks sticking up through them. As the wagon creaked over the high ground just above Frankfort, Claude noticed a brilliant new flag flying from the schoolhouse cupola. He had never seen the flag before when it meant anything but the Fourth of July, or a political rally. Today it was as if he saw it for the first time; no bands, no noise, no orators; a spot of restless colour against the sodden March sky. He turned out of his way in order...

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lkernagh - LibraryThing

One of Ours, winner of the 1923 Pulitzer Prize, is my third Willa Cather read, the first two being her more well-known stories Death Comes for the Archbishop and My Antonia. Cather’s prose is fabulous ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - traumleben - LibraryThing

Cather's 1923 Pulitzer prize winning novel about Claude Wheeler, a Nebraska farm boy who never quite figures out what he wants to do with his life until he finally enlists in the Army to go fight in ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Willa Cather (1873-1947) is considered to be one of the major fiction writers of the 20th century. She wrote the critically acclaimed novels "Death Comes for the Archbishop," "O Pioneers!," "A Lost Lady," and "The Professor's House." She won a Pulitzer

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