A Position to Command Respect: Women and the Eleventh Britannica

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Scarecrow Press, 1992 - History - 212 pages
The 1910-1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica was advertised as "the high water mark of human knowledge." Its contributors included some of the most notable figures from the late Victorian and Edwardian worlds of scholarship and knowledge. That 34 of the 1,500 contributors were women was widely perceived as signaling a significant breakthrough into the world of learning. The historical moment when these women were trying to claim cultural authority was one in which the role of women was being debated as never before. Many of the women contributors were active participants in the suffrage debate. The book examines public and private aspects of the women contributors' lives and includes short biographies.
 

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Contents

Chapter One The High Tide Mark of Human Knowledge
1
A Position to Command Respect The Women Contributors
18
The Symbolic World of Man
40
Chapter Four Public Face
62
Chapter Five Public Voice
88
Public Space and the Allocation of Privilege
110
Private Space Private Lives
136
Chapter Eight Helping Learning
156
Biographical Outlines of Women Contributors
162
Notes
181
Selected Bibliography
196
Index
205
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About the author (1992)

Gillian Thomas (Ph.D., University of London) is Professor of English and Coordinator of Women's Studies, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Her interest in the popular literature and culture of the nineteenth century and the development of a mass reading public is also reflected in her Harriet Martineau (G.K. Hall, 1985).

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