Handbook of Computational Social Choice

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Felix Brandt, Vincent Conitzer, Ulle Endriss, Jérôme Lang, Ariel D. Procaccia
Cambridge University Press, Apr 25, 2016 - Business & Economics - 535 pages
The rapidly growing field of computational social choice, at the intersection of computer science and economics, deals with the computational aspects of collective decision making. This handbook, written by thirty-six prominent members of the computational social choice community, covers the field comprehensively. Chapters devoted to each of the field's major themes offer detailed introductions. Topics include voting theory (such as the computational complexity of winner determination and manipulation in elections), fair allocation (such as algorithms for dividing divisible and indivisible goods), coalition formation (such as matching and hedonic games), and many more. Graduate students, researchers, and professionals in computer science, economics, mathematics, political science, and philosophy will benefit from this accessible and self-contained book.
 

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Contents

Introduction to Computational Social Choice
1
Coalition Formation
12
Voting
23
1
57
Weighted Tournament Solutions
85
Dodgsons Rule and Youngs Rule
103
Barriers to Manipulation in Voting
127
Control and Bribery in Voting
146
Matching under Preferences
333
Hedonic Games
356
Weighted Voting Games
377
17
399
23
421
The Axiomatic Approach and the Internet
427
26
444
Knockout Tournaments
453

Rationalizations of Voting Rules
169
9
197
Incomplete Information and Communication in Voting
223
Introduction to the Theory of Fair Allocation
261
Fair Allocation of Indivisible Goods
284
13
311
38
475
51
488
53
496
Index
529
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About the author (2016)

Felix Brandt is Professor of Computer Science and Professor of Mathematics at Technische Universität München.

Vincent Conitzer is the Kimberly J. Jenkins University Professor of New Technologies and Professor of Computer Science, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Philosophy at Duke University.

Ulle Endriss is Associate Professor of Logic and Artificial Intelligence at the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation at the University of Amsterdam.

Jérôme Lang is a senior researcher in computer science at CNRS-LAMSADE, Université Paris-Dauphine.

Ariel D. Procaccia is Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University.

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