Doctor Faustus

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Nick Hern Books, 1996 - Drama - 134 pages
29 Reviews

Drama Classics: The World's Great Plays at a Great Little Price

The classic story of the learned Doctor Faustus who sells his soul to the devil.

This edition contains two self-contained versions of the play, known as the A-text and the B-text, allowing readers to compare the available versions, and performers to choose the version that suits them best. It also contains a full introduction, notes on further reading, a chronology and a glossary of difficult words.

Edited by D.Bevington & E.Rasmussen, and introduced by Simon Trussler.

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User Review  - regularguy5mb - LibraryThing

Dr. Faustus is the classic tale of a man who sells his soul to the devil in return for power and prestige. This is the story that so many similar stories over the years have taken their cues from ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Floratina - LibraryThing

READ IN ENGLISH It is one of the stories you've read parts of in class or maybe just heard about (it is after all not as well known as Shakespeare; but I personally like this one better). Dr. Faustus ... Read full review

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About the author (1996)

Christopher Marlowe was born in Canterbury, England on February 6, 1564. He received a B.A. in 1584 and an M.A. in 1587 from Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. His original plans for a religious career were put aside when he decided to become a poet and playwright. His earliest work was translating Lucan and Ovid from Latin into English. He translated Vergil's Aeneid as a play. His plays included Tamburlaine the Great, Faustus, The Jew of Malta, and Dido, Queen of Carthage. His unfinished poem Hero and Leander was published in 1598. In 1589, he and a friend killed a man, but were acquitted on a plea of self-defense. His political views were unorthodox, and he was thought to be a government secret agent. He was arrested in May 1593 on a charge of atheism. He was killed in a brawl in a Deptford tavern on May 30, 1593.

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