High-speed steel: the development, nature, treatment, and use of high-speed steels, together with some suggestions as to the problems involved in their use

Front Cover
McGraw-Hill book company, 1910 - Steel - 360 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 101 - ... with its thinnest section in a vertical position, to prevent warping and cracking: A thin, flat die, for example, if quenched so that the flat face strikes the oil first would be warped and rendered useless. After immersion, however, the tools may be turned to any convenient position.
Page 333 - And we wish to clearly state the fact that tools cooled even as slowly as this, while they were in many cases quite soft and could be filed readily, nevertheless maintained the property of "red hardness...
Page 237 - Slide rules for the machine shop, as a part of the Taylor system of management
Page 221 - ... more correctly speaking, the portion of the lip surface immediately adjoining the cutting edge, comes in contact with these slight irregularities left on the forging owing to the tearing action, and shears these lumps off, so as to leave the receding flank of the forging comparatively smooth. 171 Thus in this tearing action, particularly in the case of cutting a thick shaving, while the cutting edge of the tool is continually in action, scraping or shearing off or rubbing away these small irregularities...
Page 333 - ... operations by cooling first slowly and then fast, as described. We also cooled them entirely in an air blast and entirely in oil, and then partly first in oil, afterward in water, and then first in water and afterward in oil. 1006 By every one of these methods we were able to make a good high speed tool; ie, a tool having a large degree of red hardness, and capable of cutting at very high cutting speeds. But by none of these processes were we able to obtain tools as uniform and regular as those...
Page 333 - On the other hand, we have secured excellent high speed tools by plunging them directly into cold water from the high heat and allowing them to become as cold as the water before removing them. Between these two extremes of slow and fast cooling — cooling in lime, charcoal or a muffle, on the one hand and in cold water on the other — further cooling experiments covering a wide range were conducted. We tried cooling them partly in water and slowly for the rest of the time ; partly in oil, and...
Page 8 - Asia, it was not until about the middle of the eighteenth century that they commenced making conquests in India.
Page 218 - ... section 1 away from the body of the forging, as indicated at point T, . The tearing away of section 1 is also assisted by the pressure of the tool upon its lower surface. 160 After this tearing action has started, the further breaking of the chip into independent sections would seem to be that of simple shearing. It should be borne in mind that in shearing a thick piece of steel the whole piece is not shorn or cut apart at the same instant, but the line at which rupture or cleavage takes place...
Page 333 - ... filed readily, nevertheless maintained the property of "red hardness" in as high a degree as the very best tools, and were capable of cutting the medium and softer steels at as high cutting speeds as the best tools which were cooled more rapidly; and which were much harder in the ordinary sense. 1005 Tools were also cooled from the high heat in a muffle or slow • cooling furnace with a similar result. On the other hand, we made excellent high speed tools by plunging them directly in cold water...
Page 332 - ... fire, and in gas heated muffles. We also constructed various furnaces for this purpose. We heated the tools by means of an electric current, with their noses under water, and out of water, and by immersion in molten cast iron. Moreover, by every one of these methods we were able to produce a first-class tool provided only the tool was heated close to the melting point. 1004 In cooling from the high heat we experimented with a large variety of methods. After being heated close to the melting point,...

Bibliographic information