THE ORIGIN OF THE LATE WAR: TRACED FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE CONSTITUTION TO THE REVOLT OF THE SOUTHERN STATES

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Page 15 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 438 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the government, and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects there will be no invasion, no using of force against or among the people anywhere.
Page 189 - ... it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union to your collective and individual happiness...
Page 189 - Towards the preservation of your government and the permanency of your present happy state, it is requisite not only that you steadily discountenance irregular opposition to its acknowledged authority, but also that you resist with care the spirit of innovation upon its principles, however specious the pretexts.
Page 189 - ... a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it ; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity, watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety ; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned ; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various...
Page 356 - That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively...
Page 184 - Art thou called being a. servant? care not for it: but if thou mayest be made free, use it rather.
Page 117 - No petition, memorial, resolution, or other paper, praying the abolition of slavery in the district of Columbia, or any State or Territory, or the Slave Trade between the States or Territories of The United States in which it now exists, shall be received by this House, or entertained in any way whatever, be, and the same is hereby, rescinded.
Page 275 - Congress, the act known as the Fugitive Slave law included, are received and acquiesced in by the Whig party of the United States as a settlement in principle and substance of the dangerous and exciting questions which they embrace...
Page 455 - I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it now exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.

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