On the Run: An Angler's Journey Down the Striper Coast

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Harper Collins, Oct 13, 2009 - Sports & Recreation - 256 pages
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Each autumn, one of nature's most magnificent dramas plays out when striped bass undertake a journey, from the northeastern United States to the Outer Banks of North Carolina, in search of food and warmer seas. Writer and angler David DiBenedetto followed this great migration -- the fall run -- for three months in the autumn of 2001.

On the Run offers vivid portrayals of the zany and obsessive characters DiBenedetto met on his travels -- including the country's most daring fisherman, an underwater videographer who chucked his corporate job in favor of filming striped bass, and the reclusive angler who claims that catching the world-record striper in 1982 sent his life into a tailspin. Along his route, DiBenedetto also delves into the natural history and biology of this great game fish, and depicts the colorful cultures of the seaside communities where the striped bass reigns supreme.

 

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On the run: an angler's journey down the striper coast

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Stripers are a game fish that seize the angler's soul, and this book offers a striking example of just how passionate this particular piscatorial pursuit can be. Written by an upcoming sporting ... Read full review

Contents

Swimming with the Fishes
1
The Run
13
On the Road
19
Running and Gunning
47
Where the Cows Come Home
69
Islands in the Sound
95
A FishsEye View
123
Gone Skishing
149
Urban Angling
171
A Fish Story
189
The Great Brackish Mother
209
The End of the Striper Road
223
Acknowledgments
237
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 42 - The pleasant'st angling is to see the fish Cut with her golden oars the silver stream, And greedily devour the treacherous bait...
Page 62 - The ultimate value in these marshes is wildness, and the crane is wildness incarnate. But all conservation of wildness is selfdefeating, for to cherish we must see and fondle, and when enough have seen and fondled, there is no wilderness left to cherish.
Page 58 - They are so large the head of one will give a good eater a dinner, and for daintinesse of diet they excell the Marybones of beefe.
Page 87 - The longer I stayed, the more eager was I to know this coast and to share its mysterious and elemental life...
Page 86 - The world to-day is sick to its thin blood for lack of elemental things, for fire before the hands, for water welling from the earth, for air, for the dear earth itself underfoot.
Page 31 - What would be the message for the men who have assigned to this fish the qualities of courage, the virtues of bravery and strength? If this fish were to vanish, how much time would be left to the men who extol it,
Page 58 - Had our founding fathers chosen a fish rather than a bird as our national emblem, it would have had to have been the striped bass.
Page 157 - His six-millimeter wet suit gave him plenty of buoyancy, and if he placed the rod between his legs and floated on his back "like an otter eating an abalone," he could actually put some leverage on the fish.
Page 204 - My wife asked me what I wanted to do for my birthday, and I told her, 'I want to catch a striper.

About the author (2009)

David DiBenedetto is the editor in chief of Garden & Gun magazine. He is the author of On the Run: An Angler’s Journey Down the Striper Coast and the editor of the New York Times bestselling The Southerner’s Handbook. He grew up in Savannah, Georgia, and now resides in Charleston, South Carolina, with his wife, Jenny; their son, Sam; and their Boykin spaniel, Pritchard.

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