The Astrology Book: The Encyclopedia of Heavenly Influences

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Visible Ink Press, Mar 1, 2003 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 928 pages
The most complete and affordable single-volume reference on Astrology available anywhere!

This massive 928-page tome is the definitive work on celestial forces and the influence of the stars and other heavenly bodies on human personality, behavior, and fate. The Astrology Book: The Encyclopedia of Heavenly Influences defines and explains more than 800 astrological terms and concepts from air signs to Zeus and everything in between.

Students of the sun and stars and the laypeople interested in knowing more about those passionate Scorpios or intuitive Pisceans can examine the total astrology culture, famous astrologers, heavenly bodies, explanations, and interpretations of every planet in every house and sign—even pesky technical terms. And to further them on their star quest, The Astrology Book includes a special section on casting a chart. It also includes a table of astrological glyphs and abbreviations, a helpful bibliography, an index, and a list of organizations, books, periodicals, and websites dedicated to the study of the influences reigning from the heavens.

The wealth of information it contains makes it is one of the most useful guides to astrology available today.

 

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The astrology book: the encyclopedia of heavenly influences

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Lewis (religious studies, Univ. of Wisconsin, Stevens Point; The Dream Encyclopedia) has updated his part glossary, part history, part how-to reference for the first time in ten years. He has added 60 ... Read full review

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Some of the info in Leo was a bit inaccurate. First of all, lions are NOT known more for their "mercy" than their ferocity in reality. Before Aesop's Fables and long before the ridiculous Wizard of Oz, lions featured heavily in ancient myths where the strongest heroes and demigods like Hercules, Samson, Gilgamesh, and others had to prove themselves by first defeating such wild and powerful creatures as lions before they could call themselves "heroes." And while there still persists a popular misconception of male lions as "lazy" due to the fact that they do tend to rest more than the other big cats, land that the lionesses do most of the hunting; it should also be remembered that male lions often spend much of their time fighting against other lions and other threats to the pride such as hyenas, etc. to the extent that their lives are greatly shortened due to their injuries. Plus, modern research has proven that male lions DO hunt, but they hunt alone as opposed to in groups like the lionesses.
And for every lion that supposedly showed mercy (or worse, cowardice) like Androcles' lion who spared him, there were hundreds of others that actually did kill people in the Roman arenas. So astrologers should use common sense when describing wild lion and thus Leo behavior and personality. And they should not assume that a lion's playfulness equates to it being tame.
Leo's can be generous and kind, but those recipients of these mercies have to be deserving. Nor should modern astrologers assume that lions or Leos while perhaps having sensitive egos cannot also defend and protect those egos. A lion's roar is only a warning when if not heeded, can lead to actual attack and at the very least serious injury to the threat. So too should a Leo's temper be regarded.
They are the only natural predator on the Zodiac wheel for a reason. And modern astrologers should never forget that fact. Anyone who disregards a lion's strength needs a serious reality check.
 

Contents

A
1
B
81
C
107
D
193
E
211
F
233
G
261
H
289
Q
567
R
571
S
585
T
639
U
695
V
707
W
741
Y
745

I
349
J
365
K
379
L
391
M
421
N
479
O
501
P
507
Z
749
Reading Your Own Astrology Chart
753
Astrological Periodicals
811
Astrological Organizations Schools and Web Resources
823
Astrological Software
859
Index
871
Back Cover
891
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

James R. Lewis is the recipient of Choice's Outstanding Academic Title award and Best Reference Book awards from the American Library Association and the New York Public Library Association. He is an internationally recognized authority on nontraditional religious groups and currently teaches religious studies at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.

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