An introduction to botany, in a series of familiar letters. To which is added, The pleasures of botanical pursuits, a poem, by S. Hoare

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1823
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Page 187 - Where'er we search, the scene presents, Wonders to charm th' admiring sense, And elevate the mind : Nor even blooms a single spray, That quivers in departing day, Or turns to meet the morning ray, But speaks a Power Divine.
Page 186 - Will happily display. The rapid pulse it can abate, The hectic flush can moderate And, blest by Him whose will is fate, May give a lengthened day.
Page 28 - ALL the known vegetable productions, upon the surface of the globe, have been reduced by naturalists to Classes, Orders, Genera, Species, and Varieties. The classes are composed of orders ; the orders of genera ; the genera of species; and the species of varieties. We may attain a clearer idea of them, by comparing them with the general divisions of the inhabitants of the earth. Vegetables resemble...
Page 26 - Linneus caught the enthusiasm, and early imbibed the same taste, with such warmth, that he was never able to bend his mind to any other pursuit. His father intended to bring him up to the church, but he showed such...
Page 8 - Muscipula there is a still more wonderful contrivance to prevent the depredations of insects: The leaves are armed with long teeth, like the antennae of insects, and lie spread upon the ground round the stem; and are so irritable, that when an insect creeps upon them, they fold up, and crush or pierce it to death.
Page 186 - As if, ambitious of a name, They sought to spread around their fame, And bade the infant buds proclaim The parent's valu'd pow'rs.
Page 185 - Of fam'd exoties rich and rare, Purple or. roseate, brown or fair, A plant more lovely towers.
Page 29 - ... Classes, Orders, Genera, Species, and Varieties. The classes are composed of orders ; the orders of genera ; the genera of species; and the species of varieties. We may attain a clearer idea of them, by comparing them with the general divisions of the inhabitants of the earth. Vegetables resemble Man ; Classes, nations of men ; Orders, tribes, or divisions of nations ; Genera, the families that compose the tribes ; Species, individuals of which families consist ; and Varieties, individuals under...
Page 186 - As if ambitious of a Name, They sought to spread around, their fame, And bade the Infant Buds proclaim, The Parent's valued power.
Page 31 - ... if that be the case, examine whether the stamens are entirely separate from the pistil and each other from top to bottom. If you find that they are perfectly distinct, and of equal height...

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