Turning Points in Japanese History

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Bert Edstrom
Routledge, Dec 16, 2013 - History - 262 pages
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So-called 'turning points' or 'defining moments' are both the oxygen and grid lines that historians and researchers seek in plotting the path of social and political development of any country. In the case of Japan, the ninth Conference of the European Association of Japanese Studies provided a unique opportunity for leading scholars of Japanese history, politics and international relations to offer an outstanding menu of 'turning points' (many addressed for the first time), over 20 of which are included here. Thematically, the book is divided into sections, including Medieval and Early Modern Japan, Japan and the West, Contested Constructs in the Study of Tokugawa and Meiji Japan, Aspects of Modern Japanese Foreign Policy, and Democracy and Monarchy in Post-War Japan.
 

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Contents

Turning Points and Defining Moments
1
The True Turning Point
17
2 1247 as a Turning Point for the Kamakura Shogunate
25
3 A Turning Point in CourtBakufu Relations During the Edo Period
34
The Letter Incident of 1869
44
The Influence of the Religious Issues on the Diplomatic Talks During the Visit of the Iwakura Delegation to Belgium
57
The Meiji Government and the Coolie Trade 186875
71
7 The Ending of Extraterritoriality in Japan
84
9 The Meiji Constitution as Miscalculation
120
10 The End of World War One as a Turning Point in Modern Japanese History
138
11 Takahashi Korekiyos Fiscal Policy and the Rise of Militarism in Japan during the Great Depression
163
12 Japan and Islam Policy During the 1930s
180
13 Japans Foreign Policy and the Yoshida Legacy Revisited
215
14 The Beginning of the End? The Problem of Imperial Succession in Modern Japan
232
Index
243
Copyright

Ruptures in a Frame of Vertical Development
102

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About the author (2013)

Bert Edströ m is Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Pacific Asia Studies at Stockholm University.

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