The Second Boys' Book of Model Aeroplanes

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Century Company, 1911 - Airplanes - 262 pages
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Page 46 - It is difficult to lay down any hard and fast rules for the relation of weight to wing surface, since the types of aeroplanes differ so widely.
Page 238 - President shall be the chief executive officer of the Club. He shall preside at all meetings of the Club and of the Board of Directors. He shall...
Page 238 - The Proceedings of the Society, and such papers or abstracts as may be approved by the Council, shall be published as soon as possible after each annual meeting. 9. AMENDMENTS. — This Constitution may be amended by a two-thirds...
Page 239 - The Secretary shall keep a record of all meetings of the Club and of the Board of Governors.
Page 67 - Before entering into the many troubles which beset our canine friends, it may be well to point out here that it is impossible to lay down any hard and fast rules in regard to doctoring as the same medicines will not suit every individual.
Page 100 - ... cut or punched in the tin as indicated in the drawing, each one eighth of an inch wide. Now bend the tin on the two upright lines until the two sides are parallel. This support is fitted to the end of a motor base and secured by nails through the three holes at the base covering the wood (Fig. F) . The end of the hook which holds the rubber strands of the motor should be passed through the opening at the end, bent over, and fastened into position with a drop or two of solder. Such a support adds...
Page 122 - ... at a slight dihedral angle. (See Fig. A.) The model is driven most efficiently by a six-inch propeller. If it be a one-piece blade, prepare a propeller blank six inches by one inch, cut from a halfinch board. Cut away to the thinnest possible blade. Use a very simple support for your propeller-shaft as well as for the motor anchorage at the extreme forward end. The planes should be tied with rubber strands to the stick and glued in position when properly adjusted. Try out your model with a motor...
Page 247 - SKIN FRICTION. Resistance offered by planes or wings. SLIP. The difference between the distance actually traveled by a propeller and that measured by the pitch. SOARING FLIGHT. A gliding movement without apparent effort. SURFACE. The extent of planes measured on one side only. SUSTAINING SURFACE.
Page 122 - ... the thinnest possible blade. Use a very simple support for your propeller-shaft as well as for the motor anchorage at the extreme forward end. The planes should be tied with rubber strands to the stick and glued in position when properly adjusted. Try out your model with a motor consisting of four strands of one-eighth-inch rubber, and increase, if necessary. You will need all your ingenuity and skill in workmanship to construct a stable model even of so simple a design which will come within...
Page 112 - E," stability planes not unlike the runnrrs iif u subject to many forces which tend to tip it to one side or the other. A gust of wind, — and the air is never perfectly quiet, — will tip one end of the plane up or down. In the early models, this tendency was met by fixing the plane at a dihedral angle. An examination of last year's models will show how common was this design. The dihedral angle lowers the center of gravity. Now, after one side of the model is raised and the plane rights itself,...

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