The Political Thought of John Locke: An Historical Account of the Argument of the 'Two Treatises of Government'

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 9, 1982 - History - 290 pages
This study provides a comprehensive reinterpretation of the meaning of Locke's political thought. John Dunn restores Locke's ideas to their exact context, and so stresses the historical question of what Locke in the Two Treatises of Government was intending to claim. By adopting this approach, he reveals the predominantly theological character of all Locke's thinking about politics and provides a convincing analysis of the development of Locke's thought. In a polemical concluding section, John Dunn argues that liberal and Marxist interpretations of Locke's politics have failed to grasp his meaning. Locke emerges as not merely a contributor to the development of English constitutional thought, or as a reflector of socio-economic change in seventeenth-century England, but as essentially a Calvinist natural theologian.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION JOHN LOCKE IN HISTORY THE PROBLEMS
5
THE DEVELOPING MIND
11
THE ESSAYS ON THE LAW OF NATURE
19
THE ESSAY ON TOLERATION
27
PART 2
41
THE TWO TREATISES AND EXCLUSION
43
SIR ROBERT FILMER
58
LOCKE AND HOBBES
77
PUBLIC GOOD AND REASON OF STATE
157
THE CONDITIONS FOR LEGITIMATE RESISTANCE
165
THE LAW OF NATURE
187
PART 4
201
THE COHERENCE OF A MIND 1
203
THE COHERENCE OF A MIND 2
214
THE COHERENCE OF A MIND 3
229
PART 5
243

PART 3
85
THE PREMISES OF THE ARGUMENT
87
THE STATE OF NATURE
96
THE CREATION OF THE LEGITIMATE POLITY
120
PREROGATIVE
148
THE CALLING TRADITION AND CHANGE
245
CONCLUSION
262
BIBLIOGRAPHY
269
INDEX
285
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