Crofutt's New Overland Tourist, and Pacific Coast Guide ...: Over the Union, Kansas, Central and Southern Pacific Railroads, Their Branches and Connections, by Rail, Water and Stage ...

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Overland Publishing Company, 1884 - Pacific States - 261 pages
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Page 119 - ... from each company. The last spikes were then presented, one of gold, from California, one of silver from Nevada, and one of gold, silver and iron from Arizona. President Stanford then took the hammer, made of solid silver, and to the handle of which were attached the telegraph wires, and with the first tap on the head of the gold spike at 12, M., the news of the event was flashed over the continent. Speeches were made as each spike was driven, and when all was completed, cheer after cheer rent...
Page 121 - Behind these men came a gang of men who half-drove the spikes and screwed on the fish-plates. At a short interval behind these came a gang of Chinamen, who drove home the spikes already inserted and added the rest. Behind these came a second squad of Chinamen, two deep on each side of the track. The inner men had shovels, the outer ones picks. Together, they ballasted the track. The average...
Page 256 - Early in the spring a party of brave men started from the valley to bring out the prisoners, expecting to find them alive and well, for it was supposed that they had provisions enough to last them through the winter. After a desperate effort, which required weeks of toil and exposure, the party suceeded in scaling the mountains, and came to the camp of the Donners.
Page 49 - Kansas are hereby authorized to construct a railroad and telegraph line, from the Missouri River, at the mouth of the Kansas River, on the south side thereof, so as to connect with the Pacific railroad of Missouri...
Page 71 - Here, too, we find preserved in the rocks the greatest abundance of deciduous leaves of the poplar, ash, elm, maple, &c., and among them some species which are found in the coal formations on the Upper Missouri. Among the fossil plants found is a species of fan-palm, which, at the time it grew here, displayed a leaf of enormous dimensions, sometimes having a spread of ten or twelve feet. These gigantic palms seem to have formed a conspicuous feature among the trees of these ancient forests.
Page 257 - After the waters of the Yellowstone roll over the upper descent, they flow with great rapidity over the apparently flat, rocky bottom, which spreads out to nearly double its width above the falls, and continues thus until near the Lower Falls, when the channel again contracts, and the waters seem, as it were, to gather themselves into one compact mass, and plunge over the descent of 350ft.
Page 257 - Upon the yellow, nearly vertical wall of the west side, the mist mostly falls, and for 300 feet from the bottom the wall is covered with a thick matting of mosses, sedges, grasses, and other vegetation of the most vivid green, which have sent their small roots into the softened rocks, and are nourished by the...
Page 256 - During the night, the threatened storm burst over them in all its fury. The old pines swayed and bent before the blast, bearing destruction and death on its snow-laden wings. The snow fell heavily and fast, as it can fall in those mountains. In the morning the terror-stricken emigrants beheld one vast expanse of snow, and the large white flakes falling thick and fast. Still there was hope. Some of the cattle and their horses remained. They could leave the wagons, and with the horses they might possibly...
Page 78 - ... making his goal. He pursued his trapping expeditions north to the British possessions, south far into New Mexico and west to the Pacific Ocean, and in this way became acquainted with all the Indian tribes in the country, and by long intercourse with them learned their languages, and became familiar with all their signs. He adopted their habits, conformed to their customs, became imbued with all their superstitions, and at length excelled them in strategy. He was a great favorite with the Crow...
Page 192 - wide berth," as you value your life. ANGEL ISLAND, three miles north of the city, is a mile and a half in length and three-quarters of a mile wide ; altitude 771 feet. On this island are quarries of brown and blue stone, which are extensively used in the city for building purposes. . GOAT ISLAND, or " Yerba Buena," two and a half miles east, nearly round, contains 350 acres ; altitude, 340 feet.

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