Travels Into the Interior of Southern Africa: In which are Described the Character and Condition of the Dutch Colonists of the Cape of Good Hope, and of the Several Tribes of Natives Beyond Its Limits: the Natural History of Such Subjects as Occurred in the Animal, Mineral, and Vegetable Kingdoms; and the Geography of the Southern Extremity of Africa. Comprehending Also a Topographical and Statistical Sketch of Cape Colony: with an Inquiry Into Its Importance as a Naval and Military Station, as a Commercial Emporium; and as a Territorial Possession, Volume 2

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1806 - Cape of Good Hope (South Africa)
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Page 45 - Come on, sir; here's the place: — stand still. — How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 41 - The east side, which runs off at right angles to the front, is still bolder, and has one point higher by several feet. The west side, along the sea-shore, is rent into deep chasms, and worn away into a number of pointed masses. In advancing to the southward about four miles, the mountain descends in steps or terraces, the lowest of which communicates by gorges with the chain that extends the whole length of the peninsula. The two wings of the front, one the Devil's Mountain, and the other the Lion's...
Page 11 - Abbé de la Caille, is strange and terrible, " The stars look larger and seem to dance ; the moon has an undulating tremor ; and the planets have a sort of beard like comets.
Page 218 - ... Hope. Knowing the latter to be a desperate attempt, they were induced to make an experiment on the former. The importance which the French have attached to this half-way station between Europe and India appears from the conferences which took place between Lord Malmesbury and Monsieur De la Croix, wherein the latter persisted that the Cape of Good Hope was of infinitely greater importance to England than the Netherlands were to France, and that if our demands for keeping it were acquiesced in,...
Page 101 - A second shakes the box, and sits up late ; Another shakes the bed, dissolving there, Till knots upon his gouty joints appear, And chalk is in his crippled fingers found ; Rots, like a...
Page 108 - ... the place affords. In the better families, most of them are taught music, and some have acquired a tolerable degree of execution. Many understand the French language, and some have made great proficiency in the English. They are expert at the needle, at all kinds of lace, knotting, and tambour work, and in general make up their own dresses, following the prevailing fashions of England brought from time to time by the female passengers bound to India, from whom they may be said to ' Catch the...
Page 44 - To those whom mere curiosity, or the more laudable desire of acquiring information, may tempt to make a visit to the summit of the Table Mountain, the best and readiest access will be found directly up the face next to the town. The ascent lies through a deep chasm to the left.
Page 8 - There is neither a volcano nor a volcanic product in the southern extremity of Africa, at least in any of those parts where I have been...
Page 30 - Table Mountain, was the spot fixed on, and the rods were put down there through hard clay, pipe-clay, iron-stone and sandstone, in successive strata, to the depth of twentythree feet. The operation of boring was then discontinued by the discovery of actual coal coming out, as miners...
Page 27 - ... is an open, airy, and extensive plain, perfectly level, composed of a bed of firm clay, covered with small hard gravel. It is surrounded by canals, or ditches, that receive the waters of the town and convey them into the bay. Two of its sides are completely built up with large and handsome houses. The barracks, originally intended for an hospital, for corn magazines, and wine cellars, is a large, well-designed, regular building, which, with its two wings, occupies part of one of the sides of...

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