A translation of nine of the most fashionable quadrilles, consisting of fifty French country dances, as performed in England and Scotland, by B. Dun

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1818
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Page 9 - By a lady of distinction, who has witnessed, and attentively studied, what is esteemed truly graceful and elegant amongst the most refined nations of Europe.
Page 12 - ... posture-mistress. — Dances from ballets are introduced; and instead of the jocund and beautifully-organized movements of hilarity in concord, we are shocked by the most extravagant theatrical imitations. The chaste minuet is banished; and, in place of dignity and grace, we behold strange wheelings on one leg, stretching out the other till our eye meets the garter ; and a variety of endless contortions, fitter for the zenana of an Eastern satrap, or the gardens of Mahomet, than the ball-room...
Page 10 - As dancing is the accomplishment most calculated to display a fine form, elegant taste, and graceful carriage to advantage; so towards it our regards must be particularly turned: and we shall find that when Beauty in all her power is to be set forth, she cannot choose a more effective exhibition. By the word exhibition, it must not be understood that I mean to insinuate any thing like that scenic exhibition which we may expect from professors of the art, who often, regardless of modesty, not only...
Page 11 - ... the opera-house. The consequence is, when a young lady rises to dance, we no longer see the graceful, easy step of the gentlewoman, but the laboured, and often indelicate exhibitions of the posture-mistress. — Dances from ballets are introduced; and instead of the jocund and beautifully-organized movements of hilarity in concord, we are shocked by the most extravagant theatrical imitations. The chaste minuet is banished; and, in place of dignity and grace, we behold strange wheelings on one...
Page 26 - France, without an absurdity too ridiculous to even imagine without laughing. There are no dancers in the world more expressive of inward hilarity and happiness than the Scotch are, when performing in their own reels. The music is sufficient (so jocund are its sounds) to set a whole company on their feet in a moment, and to dance with...
Page 10 - By the exhibition, it must not be understood that I mean to insinuate any thing like that scenic exhibition which we may expect from professors of the art, who often, regardless of modesty, not only display the symmetry of their persons, but indelicately expose them, by most improper dresses and attitudes, on the public stage. What I propose by calling dancing an elegant mode of showing a fine form to advantage, has nothing more in it, than to teach the lovely young woman to move unembarrassed and...

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