The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1894 - History - 557 pages
12 Reviews
The definite object proposed in this work is an examination of the general history of Europe and America with particular reference to the effect of sea power upon the course of that history. Historians generally have been unfamiliar with the conditions of the sea, having as to it neither special interest nor special knowledge; and the profound determining influence of maritime strength upon great issues has consequently been overlooked. This is even more true of particular occasions than of the general tendency of sea power. It is easy to say in a general way, that the use and control of the sea is and has been a great factor in the history of the world; it is more troublesome to seek out and show its exact bearing at a particular juncture. Yet, unless this be done, the acknowledgment of general importance remains vague and unsubstantial; not resting, as it should, upon a collection of special instances in which the precise effect has been made clear, by an analysis of the conditions at the given moments. -- from Preface (p. [iii]).
 

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Review: The Influence Of Sea Power Upon History, 1660 - 1783

User Review  - Goodreads

My 3-star review is for the Kindle edition or really any edition without maps. The strategy portion of the book, the big picture approach promised by the title is excellent in its own right. But the ... Read full review

Review: The Influence Of Sea Power Upon History, 1660 - 1783

User Review  - Goodreads

This book was initially published in the 1890s, and soon found itself on the night stand of every head of state that was a major power, in Europe; the President of the US; and, a New York politician ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
25
III
90
IV
139
V
173
VI
201
VII
232
VIII
254
IX
281
X
330
XI
359
XII
401
XIII
419
XIV
468
XV
505
Copyright

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About the author (1894)

The greatest U.S. military historian and one of the most influential of all nineteenth-century historians, Alfred Thayer Mahan was the son of an instructor at West Point. The younger Mahan, however, attended Annapolis and embarked on a naval career seeing duty in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico against the Confederacy. He taught briefly at Annapolis, but spent most of his academic career at the newly founded Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, where he eventually served as president. His lectures at the college formed the basis for his two major works, "The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660--1783," published in 1890, and "The Influence of Sea Power upon the French Revolution and Empire, 1793--1812," published two years later. These works attributed the dominance of Great Britain in world politics during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to its invincible navy. His ideas were picked up by Theodore Roosevelt in the United States, by Admiral von Tirpitz in Germany, and by Admiral Togo in Japan, and used to justify the building of large U.S., German, and Japanese fleets. Indeed, Mahan was assigned some of the blame for the naval race before World War I. Mahan wrote other books on sea power as well as biographies of Horatio Nelson and David Farragut. He was a founder of the Navy League and fought throughout his life for a Panama Canal.

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