Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1997 - Art - 256 pages
13 Reviews
White people are not literally or symbolically white; nor are they uniquely virtuous and pure. Racial imagery and racial representation are central to the organisation of the contemporary world but, while there are many studies of images of black and Asian people, whiteness is an invisible racial position. At the level of racial representation, whites are not of a certain race. They are just the human race, a 'colour' against which other ethnicities are always examined.
In White, Richard Dyer looks beyond the apparent unremarkability of whiteness and argues for the importance of analysing images of white people. Dyer traces the representation of whiteness by whites in Western visual culture, focusing on the mass media of photography, advertising, fine art, cinema and television.
Dyer examines the representation of whiteness and the white body in the contexts of Christianity, 'race' and colonialism. In a series of absorbing case studies, he discusses the representations of whiteness in muscle-man action cinema, from Italian 'peplum' movies to the Tarzan and Rambo series; shows the construction of whiteness in photography and cinema in the lighting of white and black faces, and analyses the representation of white women in end-of-empire fictions such as The Jewel in the Crown, and traces the disturbing association of whiteness with death, in vampire narratives and dystopian films such as Blade Runner and the Aliens trilogy.

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Review: White: Essays on Race and Culture

User Review  - Christian Holub - Goodreads

The definite highlight from the "Unsettling Whiteness" class I took this past spring. One of the keys to white supremacy is pretending that while categories like "black" and "Asian" have specific ... Read full review

Review: White: Essays on Race and Culture

User Review  - Jane - Goodreads

Smart and accessibly written. Many of these chapters would teach well. I don't think there's a terribly original or deep argument here, but it's a sound, well-written book on an important topic. Read full review


The matter of whiteness
Coloured white not coloured
Theres nothing I can do Nothing
early twentieth century

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