Three Vassar Girls in Switzerland

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Estes & Lauriat, 1890 - Children - 239 pages
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Page 64 - And whenever the way seemed long, Or his heart began to fail, She would sing a more wonderful song, Or tell a more marvellous tale. So she keeps him still a child, And will not let him go, Though at times his heart beats wild For the beautiful Pays de Vaud ; Though at times he hears in his dreams The Ranz des Vaches of old, And the rush of mountain streams From glaciers clear and cold ; And the mother at home says, " Hark ! For his voice I listen and yearn ; It is growing late and dark, And my boy...
Page 63 - And Nature, the old nurse, took The child upon her knee, Saying : " Here is a story-book Thy Father has written for thee." " Come, wander with me," she said, " Into regions yet untrod ; And read what is still unread In the manuscripts of God.
Page 219 - The glaciers creep Like snakes that watch their prey, from their far fountains, Slow rolling on ; there, many a precipice, Frost and the Sun in scorn of mortal power Have piled : dome, pyramid, and pinnacle, A city of death, distinct with many a tower And wall impregnable of beaming ice.
Page 84 - They seem to have been built for the human race, as at once their schools and cathedrals ; full of treasures of illuminated manuscript for the scholar, kindly in simple lessons to the worker, quiet in pale cloisters for the thinker, glorious in holiness for the worshipper.
Page 63 - Thy Father has written for thee." " Come, wander with me," she said, " Into regions yet untrod ; And read what is still unread In the manuscripts of God." And he wandered away and away With Nature, the dear old nurse, Who sang to him night and day The rhymes of the universe. And whenever the way seemed long, Or his heart began to fail, She would sing a more wonderful song, Or tell a more marvellous tale.
Page 205 - Mont Blanc is the monarch of mountains: They crowned him long ago, On a throne of rocks, in a robe of clouds, With a diadem of snow.
Page 148 - ... that Croz, having done as I have said, was in the act of turning round, to go down a step or two himself; at this moment Mr. Hadow slipped, fell against him, and knocked him over. I heard one startled exclamation from Croz, then saw him and Mr.
Page 148 - I planted ourselves as firmly as the rocks would permit: the rope was taut between us, and the jerk came on us both as on one man, We held, but the rope broke midway between Taugwalder and Lord Francis Douglas. For a few seconds we saw our unfortunate companions sliding downward on their backs, and spreading out their hands, endeavoring to save themselves.
Page 72 - The stream! — and do I linger here ? The clouds are on the Oberland, The Jungfrau snows look faint and far ; But bright are those green fields at hand, And through those fields comes down the Aar...
Page 219 - Slow rolling on ; there, many a precipice, Frost and the Sun in scorn of mortal power Have piled : dome, pyramid, and pinnacle, A city of death, distinct with many a tower And wall impregnable of beaming ice. Yet not a city, but a flood of ruin Is there, that from the boundaries of the sky Rolls its perpetual stream...

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