Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space

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University of Chicago Press, Jun 15, 2004 - History - 401 pages
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When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people?

Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis. Manu Goswami locates the origins and contradictions of Indian nationalism in the convergence of the lived experience of colonial space, the expansive logic of capital, and interstate dynamics. Building on and critically extending subaltern and postcolonial perspectives, her study shows how nineteenth-century conceptions of India as a bounded national space and economy bequeathed an enduring tension between a universalistic political economy of nationhood and a nativist project that continues to haunt the present moment.

Elegantly conceived and judiciously argued, Producing India will be invaluable to students of history, political economy, geography, and Asian studies.
 

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Contents

GEOGRAPHIES OF STATE TRANSFORMATION THE PRODUCTION OF COLONIAL STATE SPACE
31
ENVISIONING THE COLONIAL ECONOMY
73
MOBILE INCARCERATION TRAVELS IN COLONIAL STATE SPACE
103
COLONIAL PEDAGOGICAL CONSOLIDATION
132
SPACE TIME AND SOVEREIGNTY IN PURANICITIHAS
154
INDIA AS BHARAT A TERRITORIAL NATIVIST VISION OF NATIONHOOD 18601880
165
THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF NATIONHOOD
209
TERRITORIAL NATIVISM SWADESHI AND SWARAJ
242
CONCLUSION
277
NOTES
287
BIBLIOGRAPHY
347
INDEX
385
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Page 2 - Mother India, whose victory they wanted? My question would amuse them and surprise them, and then, not ^knowing exactly what to answer, they would look at each other and at me. I persisted in my questioning. At last a vigorous Jat, wedded to the soil from immemorial generations, would say that it was the dharti, the good earth of India, that they meant. What earth? Their particular village patch, or all the patches in the district or province, or in the whole of India? And...
Page 2 - The mountains and the rivers of India, and the forests and the broad fields, which gave us food, were all dear to us, but what counted ultimately were the people of India, people like them and me, who were spread out all over this vast land. Bharat Mata, Mother India, was essentially these millions of people, and victory to her meant victory to these people.

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About the author (2004)

Manu Goswani is an assistant professor of history and East Asia studies at New York University.