Rural Studies: With Hints for Country Places

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Charles Scribner & Company, 1867 - Country life - 295 pages
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Page 226 - That lay in the house that Jack built. This is the cock that crowed in the morn That waked the priest all shaven and shorn That married the man all tattered and torn That kissed the maiden all forlorn That milked the cow with the crumpled horn That tossed the dog That worried the cat That killed the rat That ate the malt That lay in the house that Jack built.
Page 211 - Here (in the 232 country) is your quiet landholder, living in the performance of a humble range of duties — rearing brown-cheeked boys, who will make their way to high places of trust — to generalships, to governorships, by dint of their sturdy habits of self-denial, and of work, which have belonged to their early life; and, on the other hand, yonder by the gas-lights is your business man of the city, rearing boys under the shadow of the Broadway shops, who, by reason of no self-denial at all,...
Page 295 - No begging wants his middle fortune bite : But sweet content exiles both misery and spite. His certain life, that never can deceive him, Is full of thousand sweets and rich content ; The smooth-leaved beeches in the field receive him, With coolest shade, till noontide's heat be spent. His life is neither toss'd in boisterous seas Or the vexatious world, or lost in slothful ease : Pleased and full bless'd he lives, when he his God can please.
Page 295 - His life is neither toss'd in boist'rous seas Of troublous world, nor lost in slothful ease : Pleased and full blest he lives, when he his God can please. His bed of wool yields safe and quiet sleeps, While by his side his faithful spouse hath place...
Page 165 - ... of individual beauties ; but the charming oneness of effect which shall make his place an exemplar of taste and a perpetual delight is somehow wanting. The true art of landscape gardening lies in such disposition of roadways, plantations, walks, and buildings as shall most effectively develop all the natural beauties of the land under treatment, without conflicting (or rather in harmony) with the uses to which such lands may be devoted. Thus, in a private estate, home interests and conveniences...
Page 21 - ... illustrative hints toward the amendment of rural life — whether in matters of good husbandry, or of good taste ; I have furthermore ventured upon certain homeliness of detail in these opening pages, to show that I may have privilege of speech. There is no manner of work done upon a New England farm...
Page 145 - ... the outside world with indications of orderly thrift, blooming and carrying greeting to the very threshold of the place ? First impressions count for a great deal — whether in our meeting with a woman, or with a village. Slipshoddiness is bad economy in towns, as in people. Every season there is a whirl of citizens, tired of city heats and costs, traversing the country in half hope of being wooed to some summer home, where the trees and the order invite tranquillity and promise enjoyment. A...
Page 298 - WET DAYS AT EDGEWOOD, with Old Farmers, Old Gardeners and Old Pastorals...
Page 17 - of the teamster, or the cluck of a matronly hen, or hum of bees, or the murmur of the brook. All this inviting to a very dreamy indolence, which, I must confess, was somehow vastly enjoyable. Nothing to see ? Lo, the play of light and shade over the distant hills, or the wind, making tossed and streaming wavelets on the rye. Nothing to hear ? Wait a moment and you shall listen to the bursting melodious roundelay of the merriest singer upon earth— the black and white coated...

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