The Pandit, Volume 6

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Page 208 - The meaning (of the aphorism), therefore, is that as dreaming, so also the consciousness in dreaming, arises from a particular conjunction of the soul with the internal organ, and from reproduction. The difference extends thus far that cognition in dreaming results from reproduction produced by former experience, while consciousness in dreaming results from reproduction produced by experience arising at the very time. It has therefore been stated by...
Page 260 - Plucks back his trunk in shivering haste From the cold wave he fain would taste. The very fowl that haunt the mere Stand doubtful on the bank, and fear To dip them in the wintry wave As cowards dread to meet the brave. The frost of night, the rime of dawn Bind flowerless trees and glades of lawn: Benumbed in apathetic chill Of icy chains they slumber still. You hear the hidden saras cry From floods that wrapped in vapour lie, And frosty-shining sands reveal Where the unnoticed rivers steal.
Page 180 - Inferential cognition is that one thing is the effect or cause of, conjunct with, repugnant to, or inherent in, another." The Candm-kanta-bhdsya remarks, " eka-artha-samavayi ca-iti ca-arthah." 2 3, 1, 9, "The conjunct, the inherent, the inherent in one [and the same] thing, and the contradictory (are means of proof...
Page 210 - ... organ of sense cannot be predicated. And should it be contended that the first is cognition inasmuch as it is generated by contiguity of the organ and object of sense, we reply that it is not so, for part only of the causal apparatus cannot prove homogeneity in the product, else all products would be uniform as having time and space as their common antecedents. Moreover, if pleasure were cognition, the pleasure which is not produced through contiguity of the organ and object of sense, would be...
Page 100 - ... the general term non-existence to antecedent non-existence, so is there also of perception. There is a perceptive knowledge of antecedent, as of subsequent, nonexistence, by means of experience rendered possible by apposition of the sense-organ and its object, and of knowledge of the non-existent. It may be asked : Inasmuch as antecedent non-existence has no beginning, how is it that there is no perception of it long before the production of conjunction of the two halves of a water-jar &c., the...
Page 78 - There is no such assertion antecedent to its production. It is therefore inferred that it is during that time non-existent. While straws are in course of weaving, or threads of joining, or when clay is placed on the potter's wheel, while the work of the potter &c. is it yet going on, there is a universally experienced sensitive cognition that there will be in that place a mat, or a piece of cloth, or a water-jar, inasmuch, as it is producing during the tension of the eyes. Herein a cognition constituted...
Page 76 - ... &c., is an illation from only positive conditions; Earth differs from other substances inasmuch as it is possessed of odours, &c. is an illation from only negative conditions ; The mountain is fiery inasmuch as it smokes &c., is an illation from both positive and negative conditions. Memory ig uniform, dependent on the reproduction called permanent mental impression, the universal form whereof is dependent on assurance not characterised by inattention. In another point of view also intelligence...
Page 231 - It may be urged that if the difference between pleasure and pain and cognition depend on a difference in the causes, and if the difference between pleasure and pain be like that between a post...
Page 27 - Inherence is the cause of the notion (that the one) is here (in the other) in the relationship subsisting among things that are inseparable, standing to one another in...
Page 24 - ... acquiesce in the doctrine that the power of the terms cow &c. is denotative of an individual characterised by the form of the universal. It has therefore been laid down in the aphorism of Gautama that particulars characterised by the form of the universal, are the object of the term. V. teriolity!7 Aph. 21. The prior and posterior [are produced] by two objects occupying the same space and time and near and remote.

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