Analysis of Sharon waters, Schoharie County

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John J. Schroeder, medical bookseller, 1854 - Avon Springs (N.Y.) - 96 pages
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Page 48 - Now, the number of square inches of surface in a man of ordinary height and bulk is 2500 ; the number of pores, therefore, 7,000,000, and the number of inches of perspiratory tube 1,750,000, that is, 145,833 feet, or 48,600 yards, or nearly twenty-eight miles.
Page 46 - Taken separately, the little perspiratory tube, with its appended gland, is calculated to awaken in the mind very little idea of the importance of the system to which it belongs ; but when the vast...
Page 47 - Could we need a stronger argument for enforcing the necessity of attention to the skin ? On the pulps of the fingers, where the ridges of the sensitive layer of the true skin are somewhat finer than in the palm of the hand, the number of pores on a square inch a little exceeded that of the palm ; and on the heel, where the ridges are coarser, the number of pores in the square inch was 2268, and the length of the tube 567 inches, or 47 feet.
Page 47 - Wilson: — (I counted the perspiratory pores in the palm of the hand, and found 3,528 in a square inch. Now, each of these pores being the aperture of a little tube of about a quarter of an inch long, it follows that in a square inch of skin on the palm of the hand there exists a length of tube equal to 882 inches, or 73^ feet.
Page 47 - To arrive at something like an estimate of the value of the perspiratory system, in relation to the rest of the organism, I counted the perspiratory pores on the palm of the hand, and found 3528 in a square inch. Now, each of these pores being the aperture of a little tube of about a quarter of an inch long, it follows that in a square inch of skin on the palm of the hand, there exists a length of tube equal to 882 inches, or 73i feet.
Page 94 - ... and we may infer that the supposed homoeopathic cures are referable to a natural and spontaneous cure, aided, in many cases, by a strict attention to diet and regimen. What effect can be expected from a decillionth part of a drop of laudanum, or a millionth of a grain of charcoal ? Hahnemann says, it is foolish to doubt the possibility of that which really occurs ; and adds, that...
Page 48 - To obtain an estimate of the length of tube of the perspiratory system of the whole surface of the body, 2800 might be taken as a fair average of the number of pores in the square inch, and 700, consequently, of the number of inches in length. Now, the number of square inches of surface in a man of ordinary height and bulk is...
Page 81 - ... there are numerous persons who flock about the springs during the drinking season, without any knowledge of the composition of the waters, and little or none of their effects, who contrive to dispose of their directions to the ignorant and unwary, with no other effect than to injure the reputation of the water anu destroy the prospects of the diseased.
Page 43 - The pa pi lire are sometimes collected into masses and are arranged in parallel rows, giving rise to the ridges and furrows seen upon the palm of the hand and sole of the foot. The dermis or true skin varies in thickness in different parts of the cutaneous surface, being most dense on the back, outer sides of the limbs, palms of the hands and soles of the feet; and contrasting, in this particular, with the inner side of the limbs, the breast and the back of the hands and the eyelids. The thickness...
Page 36 - It is said that persons who take little or no salt with their food, are very subject to intestinal worms. Lord Somerville, in his address to the Board of Agriculture, states that the ancient laws of Holland "ordained men to be kept on bread alone, unmixed with salt, as the severest punishment that could be inflicted upon them in their moist climate ; the effect was horrible : these wretched criminals are said to have been devoured by worms, engendered in their own stomachs.

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