Uncle Ben: A Story for Little Folks

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Lee and Shepard, 1866 - Children - 96 pages
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Page 56 - Almost at the top of the mast, and nearly a hundred feet from the water, there are two sticks, which are called the ' cross-trees.' Wheu the ship reaches any part of the ocean where whales are found, men are sent up to the cross-trees to look out. 5. " When a whale is seen, one of the men calls out, ' There she blows ! ' This great fish draws water into his mouth, and then blows it up in the air ; and this is what they mean by
Page 59 - When they get the whale alongside the ship, they cut out the fat, or ' blubber,' in long strips, and hoist it on board the vessel. It is then chopped up in small pieces, and tried out in great kettles. The oil is put into barrels, and stowed in the hold. 11. "I have told you how to catch a whale, so that you may understand the story which I am now going to tell you. 12. " I sailed in the ship Jane, for the South Pacific Ocean, long before either one of you was born. We went round Cape Horn, which...
Page 58 - ... boats and go after him. They row up to the huge' monster1 of the deep with very little noise, and then throw one or two harpoons into him. 7. " A harpoon is a kind of iron spear, with a wooden handle, to which a long rope is fastened. When the whale feels the iron, he dives down into the deep, or swims away as fast as he can. Sometimes he drags the boat after him, at a frightful speed, for many miles ; and it often happens that the men in the boat have to cut the line, in order to save their...
Page 54 - WHEN I was a young man, I went on a whaling voyage. I will tell you how whales are caught. 2. " A whale is the largest sea animal ; some are a good deal longer than my barn there. Ships that go out to catch whales are often three or four years away from home, and go off thousands of miles. 3. " The ship has a great many boats, which are hoisted up at the sides. The men go out in the boats, and when they catch a whale, tow it to the ship. 4. "Almost at the top of the mast, and nearly a hundred feet...
Page 78 - Yes, child, but it wasn't any such place as your chamber. It was cold, dark, and damp. I laid the poor boy in his bunk, and tried to find out where he was hurt; but he was so weak he could tell me nothing. " If he had been my own son, I could not have felt any worse. I could not help thinking of his poor mother, as I sat by the side of his bunk, watching over him. What would she have said if she could see her darling child, sick in that dirty, dark place ? How she would have wept...
Page 87 - ... not a dry eye in the ship when it was told that poor George, whom we all loved, was dead. 17. " We dressed him in his clean clothes, and bore his body upon deck, where we covered it with the American flag. At noon the sad cry of ' All hands to bury the dead ' sounded gloomily through the ship. 18. " The body of poor George, sewed up in a piece of sail-cloth, was placed on a plank, still covered with the American flag. It was raised upon the rail, ready to be cast into the sea. 19. " The captain,...
Page 75 - You were just going away in the boat after the whale," replied Flora. " So I was. "Well, we rowed close up to the whale, and sent one iron into him. Before we could strike him again, he turned upon us, and with one blow smashed our frail boat all to pieces.
Page 83 - ... o'clock, finding that George slept easily, I called one of my shipmates to take my place. He was very willing to do so ; but before I left him, I charged him, over and over again, to keep awake and mind the boy.
Page 55 - Almost up at the top of the mast, and more than a hundred feet from the water, there are two sticks, which are called the cross-trees. When the ship reaches any part of the ocean where whales are found, men are sent up to the cross-trees to look out. " When a whale is seen, one of the men calls out, * There she blows!

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