Quantum Field Theory

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 6, 1996 - Science - 487 pages
9 Reviews
This book is a modern introduction to the ideas and techniques of quantum field theory. After a brief overview of particle physics and a survey of relativistic wave equations and Lagrangian methods, the author develops the quantum theory of scalar and spinor fields, and then of gauge fields. The emphasis throughout is on functional methods, which have played a large part in modern field theory. The book concludes with a brief survey of "topological" objects in field theory and, new to this edition, a chapter devoted to supersymmetry. Graduate students in particle physics and high energy physics will benefit from this book.
 

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Review: Quantum Field Theory

User Review  - Brian Powell - Goodreads

Excellent text on quantum fields. I didn't use this as a primary text book, but found it very helpful as a supplementary source on certain topics. The writing is clear and focused, and most important ... Read full review

Review: Quantum Field Theory

User Review  - Adam Getchell - Goodreads

Moderately clear exposition. Mathematics fairly well covered, although you have to read some sections over several times to keep track of everything. Shorter than Peskin & Schroeder, and probably a good prerequisite to tackling that 800+ page tome. Read full review

Contents

Introduction synopsis of particle physics
1
12 Gravitation
2
13 Strong interactions
3
14 Weak interactions
4
15 Leptonic quantum numbers
5
16 Hadronic quantum numbers
7
17 Resonances
8
18 The quark model
9
72 NonAbelian gauge fields and the FaddeevPopov method
245
Feynman rules in the Lorentz gauge
250
Gaugefield propagator in the axial gauge
254
73 Selfenergy operator and vertex function
255
Geometrical interpretation of the Legendre transformation
260
Thermodynamic analogy
262
74 WardTakahashi identities in QED
263
75 BecchiRouetStora transformation
270

19 SU2 SU3 SU4 The particles A Fig 13 have the quark content
12
110 Dynamical evidence for quarks
15
111 Colour
18
112 QCD
22
113 Weak interactions
23
Guide to further reading
24
Singleparticle relativistic wave equations 21 Relativistic notation
25
22 KleinGordon equation
27
23 Dirac equation
29
Su2 and the rotation group
30
St2 C and the Lorentz group
36
24 Prediction of antiparticles
42
algebra of y matrices
46
26 Nonrelativistic limit and the electron magnetic moment
52
spin operators and the zero mass limit
55
28 Maxwell and Proca equations
64
29 Maxwells equations and differential geometry
69
Summary
77
Lagrangian formulation symmetries and gauge fields
79
31 Lagrangian formulation of particle mechanics
80
variational principle and Noethers theorem
81
33 Complex scalar fields and the electromagnetic field
90
the BohmAharonov effect
98
35 The YangMills field
105
36 The geometry of gauge fields
112
Summary
124
Guide to further reading
125
Canonical quantisation and particle interpretation
126
42 The complex Klein Gordon field
135
43 The Dirac field
137
44 The electromagnetic field
140
Radiation gauge quantisation
142
Lorentz gauge quantisation
145
45 The massive vector field
150
Summary
152
Guide to further reading
153
Path integrals and quantum mechanics
154
52 Perturbation theory and the S matrix
161
53 Coulomb scattering
170
differentiation
172
55 Further properties of path integrals We have shown that the transition amplitude from qt to qttf is given by
174
some useful integrals
179
Summary
181
Pathintegral quantisation and Feynman rules scalar and spinor fields
182
62 Functional integration
186
63 Free particle Greens functions
189
64 Generating functionals for interacting fields
196
65 04 theory
200
2point function
202
4point function
204
66 Generating functional for connected diagrams
207
67 Fermions and functional methods
210
68 The S matrix and reduction formula
217
69 Pionnucleon scattering amplitude
224
610 Scattering cross section
232
Summary
238
Guide to further reading
239
Pathintegral quantisation gauge fields
240
Photon propagator pathintegral method Here we simply consider the generating functional
242
Propagator for transverse photons
243
76 SlavnovTaylor identities
273
77 A note on ghosts and unitarity
276
Summary
280
Guide to further reading
281
Spontaneous symmetry breaking and the WeinbergSalam model
282
82 The Goldstone theorem
287
83 Spontaneous breaking of gauge symmetries
293
84 Superconductivity
296
85 The WeinbergSalam model
298
Summary
306
Guide to further reading
307
Renormalisation
308
Dimensional analysis
311
92 Dimensional regularisation of theory
313
Loop expansion
317
93 Renormalisation of if theory
318
Counterterms
321
94 Renormalisation group
324
95 Divergences and dimensional regularisation of QED
329
96 1loop renormalisation of QED
337
Anomalous magnetic moment of the electron
343
Asymptotic behaviour
345
97 Renormalisability of QED
347
98 Asymptotic freedom of YangMills theories
353
99 Renormalisation of pure YangMills theories
362
910 Chiral anomalies
366
Cancellation of anomalies
373
breakdown
375
The effective potential
377
Loop expansion of the effective potential
380
integration in d dimensions
382
the gamma function
385
Summary
387
Guide to further reading
388
10 Topological objects in field theory
390
101 The sineGordon kink
391
102 Vortex lines
395
103 The Dirac monopole
402
104 The i HooftPolyakov monopole
406
105 Instantons
414
Quantum tunnelling 0vacua and symmetry breaking
420
Summary
424
Supersymmetry
426
112 Lorentz transformations Dirac Weyl and Majorana spinors
427
Some further relations
436
113 Simple Lagrangian model
440
Fierz rearrangement formula
444
closure of commutation relations
446
Mass term
450
115 Towards a superPoincare algebra
452
116 Superspace
459
117 Superfields
464
Chiral superfield
467
118 Recovery of the WessZumino model
470
some 2spinor conventions
473
Summary
475
References
476
Index
482
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