A philosophical and political history of the settlements and trade of the Europeans in the East and West Indies, Volume 6

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Printed by Mundell and son, 1804 - Business & Economics
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Page 12 - Thefe birds are often feen fighting together with great fury and obftinacy. The ftrokes they give with their beak are fo fudden and fo quick, that they are not diftinguifhable by the eye. Their wings move with fuch agility, that they feem not to have any motion.
Page 374 - I do not flatter myself that, at the period of that happy revolution, my name will be still in remembrance ; but I shall, at least, be able to say, that I have contributed, as much as was in my power, to the happiness of my fellow-creatures, and pointed out the way, though at a distance, for the bettering of their condition. This agreeable thought will stand me in the stead of glory. It will be the delight of my old age, and the consolation of my latest moments.
Page 12 - ... was formerly devoured by infects. As the air was not then purified, the ground cleared, the woods cut down, nor the waters drained ofF, thefe little animals deftroyed, without oppofition, all the productions of nature. None of them were ufeful to mankind*. There is only one at prefent, which is the bee ; but this is fuppofed to have been carried from the old to the new world. The favages call it the Englifh fly; and it is only found near the coafts. Thefe circumftances announce it to be of foreign...
Page 12 - They are more heard than feen ; and their noife refembles that of a fparrow. Thefe little birds are all impatience. When they come near a flower, if they find it faded and withered, they tear all the leaves afunder. The precipitation with which they peck it, betrays, as it is faid...
Page 11 - This neft is half an inch in depth, and about an inch in diameter. There are never found more than two eggs in it about the fize of the fmalleft peas.
Page 374 - ... be one day extended from one extremity of the world to the other, that chain of union and benevolence which ought to connect all civilized people! May they never more carry among savage nations the example of vice and oppression! I do not flatter myself that, at the period of that happy revolution, my name will be still in remembrance ; but I shall, at least, be able to say, that I have contributed, as much as was in my power, to the happiness of my fellow-creatures, and pointed out the way,...
Page 12 - America," fays this elegant writer, " was formerly devoured by infects. As the air was not then purified, the ground cleared, the woods cut down, nor the waters drained ofF, thefe little animals deftroyed, without oppofition, all the productions of nature. None of them were ufeful to mankind*. There is only one at prefent, which is the bee ; but this is fuppofed to have been carried from the old to the new world. The favages call it the Englifh fly ; and it is only found near the coafts. Thefe circumftances...
Page 24 - If among thefe emigrants there are any who are not of age, their fervitude lafts till they arrive at that period, which is fixed at twenty-one for the boys, and eighteen for the -girls. None of thofe who are contracted for have a right to marry without the approbation of their mafter, who fets what price he choofes on his confent. If any one of them...
Page 306 - Mate, the difproportion, attending fuch exactions, is an injuftice equal to the cruelty of the exactions themfelves. " Previous to all the laws " of fociety, man had a right to fubfift. And " is he to lofe that right by the eftablifhment of " laws ? To fell the produce of the earth to the " people, at an exorbitant price, is, in reality, to " deprive them of it. To wrefl from them, by " a tax, the natural means of preferving life, is
Page 39 - ... the men of property, and the hirelings ; that is to say masters and slaves form two classes of citizens, unfortunately, in opposition to one another. In vain have some modern authors wished by sophistry to establish a treaty of peace between these two states. The rich on all occasions are disposed to obtain a great deal from the poor at little expence ; and the poor are ever inclined to set too high a value on their labour : while the rich man must always give the law in this too unequal bargain.

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