The American Light-house Guide: with Sailing Directions, for the Use of the Mariner ...: With a General View of the Coast from the St. Lawrence to the Rio de Norte, Including and Account of the Lights on the Gulf of Mexico, Carribean [sic] Sea, and the South American Atlantic Coast; Sailing Directions for the Gulf and River St. Lawrence ...

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W.M. Morrison, 1845 - Lighthouses - 189 pages
 

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Page 129 - Cape Gaspe. These winds frequently blow strong for three or four days in succession ; the westerly winds being almost always accompanied with fine, dry, clear, and sunny weather ; the easterly winds as frequently the contrary, cold, wet, and foggy. In the spring, the easterly winds most prevail, frequently blowing for several weeks in succession. As the summer advances, the westerly winds become more frequent, and the SW wind may be said to be the prevailing wind in summer in all parts of the river...
Page 129 - ... lead, with a chart containing correct soundings. The fogs, which accompany easterly gales, extend high up into the atmosphere, and cannot be looked over from any part of the rigging of a ship. They, however...
Page 90 - Crawford's survey of the place, was published by the Admiralty a short time ago, which, with the following directions from the chief pilot, should be in the possession of masters of vessels bound there. " It may be approached with less danger than any port in the United States, as the whole line of coast west of the Sabine, in Jive fathoms of water, is the best of holding ground, and a vessel may ride with perfect safety, throughout the year ; so that masters of vessels bound to Galveston, having...
Page 88 - A strong current draws south-west, after passing the bar, running at the rate of from three to four knots an hour; and in approaching the river at Velasco, this current must be carefully provided for, especially with a north-east wind.
Page 129 - Gulf are frequently covered with it, and vessels are sometimes beset for many days. Being unfitted for contending with this danger, they often suffer from it, and are occasionally lost ; but serious accidents from this cause do not frequently occur, because the ice is generally in a melting state from the powerful effect of the sun in spring. In the fall of the year accidents from ice seldom occur except when the winter commences suddenly, or when vessels linger imprudently late from the temptation...
Page 129 - Light south winds take place occasionally; but north winds are not common in summer, although they sometimes occur. Steady NW winds do not blow frequently before September, excepting for a few hours at a time, when they generally succeed easterly winds which have died away to a calm, forming the commencement of strong winds, and usually veering to the SW The NW wind is dry, with bright clear sky, flying clouds, and showers. After the autumnal equinox, winds to the northward of west become more common,...
Page 89 - It is situated on an island at the mouth of a bay of its own name, about 450 miles west by south of New Orleans, and 230 miles southeast of Austin City. The island which separates the bay from the Gulf of Mexico is about thirty miles long, from east to west, and about a mile and a half wide. The distance from the island across the bay by the railroad bridge to the mainland is about two miles. For the defence of the city...
Page 117 - Its harbour is one of the best in the world, being deep enough for vessels of the largest class ; sufficiently capacious to receive a thousand ships of war ; and so safe, that vessels ride securely without cable or anchor. The entrance is by a channel half a mile long, so narrow that only a single vessel can enter at once, and fortified through the whole distance with platforms, works, and artillery. The mouth of this channel is secured by two strong castles, as...
Page 188 - At f of a mile to the northward of the lighthouse is the beacon light, fixed on the edge of a rocky ledge, forming the west side of the channel, and having deep water close to it. A breakwater is erected...
Page 129 - The prevailing winds during the navigable season are either directly up or directly down the estuary, following the course of the chains of high lands on either side of the great valley of the St. Lawrence. Thus a SE wind in the gulf becomes ESE between Anticosti and the South coast, ENE above Point de Monts, and NE above Green Island. The westerly winds do not appear to be so much guided in direction by the high lands, excepting along the South coast, where we have observed a WSW wind at the island...

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