A Sketch of the Geography and Geology of the Himalaya Mmountains and Tibet: The high peaks of Asia

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Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1907 - Geology - 117 pages
 

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Page 22 - About 1852 the chief computer of the office at Calcutta informed Sir Andrew Waugh that a peak designated XV had been found to be higher than any other hitherto measured in the world. This peak was discovered by the computers to have been observed from six different stations ; on no occasion had the observer suspected that he was viewing through his telescope the highest point of the earth.
Page 23 - ... direction generally northwest, falls into the southern end of the sea of Aral. As I had the good fortune to be the first European who in later times had succeeded in reaching the sources of this river, and as, shortly before setting out on my journey, we had received the news of her gracious Majesty's accession to the throne, I was...
Page 22 - Sir Andrew Waugh had always adhered to the rule of assigning to every geographical object its true local or native name; but here was a mountain, the highest in the world, without any local or native name that he was able to discover. He determined, therefore, to name the great snow peak after Sir George Everest, his former chief, the celebrated Indian geodesist.
Page 17 - Turkestan than extend the simple system introduced by Montgomerie for the Karakoram ; his method of constellations is more suitable for the peaks of Asia than a long series of successive numbers from west to east would be. We need not design constellations to include one whole range, and we need not...
Page 22 - ... many panoramic drawings of the snow-peaks of the Himalayas. Their mission unfortunately ended in the death of the second brother, Adolphe, who was killed at Kashgar. In 1855 Hermann de Schlagintweit visited a hill in Nepal named Kaulia, near Katmandu, and from it took observations to the snow-peaks. He saw the mountain called Devadhunga by Hodgson, and he identified it as Mount Everest;' he, however, repudiated Hodgson's name of Devadhunga, and certified that the local native name for the peak...
Page 13 - Chongsa, a most conspicuous landmark from all the elevated parts of North Guge and Chumurti, and also visible from Almora on the Indian side, where, however, its appearance is so modest that, till...
Page 22 - Everest;3 he, however, repudiated Hodgson's name of Devadhunga, and certified that the local native name for the peak was Gaurisankar. Continental geographers, accepting Schlagintweit's views, have continued to this day to call the highest mountain in the world Gaurisankar ; the Indian Survey, however, were unable to reconcile Schlagintweit's results with their own, and have declined to follow him. The diagram in Fig. i illustrates the tour of Hermann de Schlagintweit, who visited the two stations...
Page 23 - AK's exploration. On page iv. of this narrative occurs the following passage : — " On January 6 they reached Dung Chaka, 15,700 feet above sea-level. A i 'jut 10 miles to the east there is a lofty snowy peak called Jhomogangar, somewhat of the same shape as the Kailas peak near Mtinsarowar ; it is a noted object of worship, being considered as a female divinity.
Page 23 - I may so term it, newly re- discovered lake ; but on considering that by thus introducing a new name, however honoured, into our maps, great confusion in geography might arise, I deemed it better to retain the name of Sir-i-kol, the appellation given to it by our...

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