Austin Friars, Volume 2

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1870
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Page 311 - A Eighted Wrong. By EDMUND YATES, author of " Black Sheep," &c. 3 vols. Gwendoline's Harvest. By the Author of " Lost Sir Massingberd," " Found Dead," &c. 2 vols. A Fool's Paradise. By THOMAS ARCHER, author of " Strange Work,
Page 131 - ... imagine that she should wish it herself. If you have the feelings of a gentleman or the heart of a man you ought not to wish it." " I have not come here to be taught what is becoming either to a man or a gentleman." " If you will allow me to say so, while things are as they are at present, you ought not to come here at all.
Page 311 - ... STRAND. Gold and Tinsel. By the Author of "Ups and Downs of an Old Maid's Life." 3 vols. Sidney Bellew. A Sporting Story. By FRANCIS FRANCIS. 2 vols. Grif; a Story of Australian Life. By B. LEOPOLD FARJEON. 2 vols. Not while She Lives. By the Author of " Faithless ; or the Loves of the Period.
Page iv - LONDON : PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS. CONTENTS OF VOL. I. I. FATHER AND DAUGHTER ... ... 1 II. WRITTEN IN THE SAND ... ... 21 III. THE BROTHERS ... ... ... ... 36 IV. THE 'SANS SOTJCI'...
Page 311 - TWO-SHILLING VOLUMES, Uniformly bound in Illustrated Wrappers. To be had at every Railway Stall and of every Bookseller in the Kingdom. Sword and Gown. Sans Merci. Maurice Dering. By the Author of
Page 16 - I do love Mrs. Friars as I never thought it was possible for a man to love a woman ; but she does not love me.' He was learning tact, this man who had once so galled and wounded Yorke. Intuitively he felt that, in the depth of her woman's pity for him, Kate would lose some part of her own pain for herself. They were both in the same predicament — he loving an indifferent woman, she loving a man whose whole heart was given to another : and so when she broke out, ' O, Luke, I am sorry for you,'...
Page 168 - There are the new wharves and warehouses erected but yesterday; there are the old granaries and buildings that stood by the river ere railways were thought of; through the arches of London-bridge we catch a glimpse of the Custom - house ; and still lower down the Tower, with a forest of masts intervening. Between us and the City the Thames sweeps onward to the sea — the sunlight is dancing over it ; whilst along the Silent Highway barges laden with hay, and looking more picturesque than can well...
Page 27 - God,' he used to think to himself, walking to and from his lodgings, hurrying to banks, keeping all sorts of business appointments, slaving in his office as he had never slaved for Hurward and Gaskarth, ' if she were to die, what would become of me ?' What, indeed ! when even so poor a hope as that he cherished had made his life richer and fuller of promise than ever it seemed before — when there was nothing in the future in which Yorke's image did not mix and mingle. When he dreamt of wealth,...
Page 158 - And at this juncture Mr. Collis rose, and stuffing his hands into his trousers -pockets, began walking vehemently up and down the room. ' It must seem an utter piece of quixotism my pleading and praying this way to you about a mere woman...
Page 33 - ... never flowed over shoulders white as snow,smooth as alabaster, in a rich veil to her slender waist; and Bertram never spent all his time discoursing to her about their mutual happiness, and twining her shining curls round his fingers. If he had she would have hated him; and as for Rosabella, instead of sitting in the proper attitude described, I have no doubt she flattened her delicate nose against the window-pane, watching for Bertram's coming. Heigho ! were any Bertram I cared for coming to...

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