Astronomy: A Revision of Young's Manual of Astronomy ..., Volume 1

Front Cover
Ginn, 1926 - Astronomy - 962 pages
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Contents

Altitude of the Pole Equals the Observers Latitude
23
The Oblique Sphere
24
The Astronomical Triangle
30
The Celestial Globe
34
ASTRONOMICAL INSTRUMENTS
37
The Simple Refracting Telescope
38
Resolving Power
41
Action of the Achromatic Lens
42
Reflecting Telescopes
45
Four Arrangements of the 60Inch Reflector of the Mt Wilson Observatory
47
The Equatorial Mounting
48
The DrivingClock of the 100Inch Hooker Telescope
49
The 100Inch Hooker Telescope of the Mt Wilson Observatory
50
Observing at the Cassegrain Focus of the 100Inch Reflector of the Mt Wilson Observatory
51
The 40Inch Refractor of the Yerkes Observatory
52
Structural Plan of the 150Foot Tower Telescope of the Mt Wilson Solar Observatory
54
The Metcalf Telescope of the Harvard College Observatory
55
Compensation Pendulums
56
A Chronograph Record
58
A Chronograph
59
The Transit Instrument Schematic
60
Reticle of a Transit Instrument
61
A Broken Transit
62
Meridian Circle in United States Naval Observatory Washington
64
A 5Inch Altazimuth
66
The Filar Position Micrometer
67
A Complete Position Micrometer
68
The Sextant 70 RAAN 35 Shooting the Sun with the Sextant
71
Erecting the Iron Column of the 40Inch Telescope
74
PROBLEMS OF PRACTICAL ASTRONOMY
75
FIGURE PAGE 36 Meridian Altitudes and the Determination of the Polar Point
76
An Ancient Astronomical Instrument the Gnomon
78
A Zenith Telescope
80
The Azimuth of Polaris
85
Plane Sailing
89
Circles of Position
93
Relation of Linear Diameter to Apparent Diameter and Distance
95
The Geocentric Parallax
97
Refraction of Light in the Earths Atmosphere
99
Atmospheric Refraction Increases the Altitude
100
Dip of the Horizon
104
THE EARTH AS AN ASTRONOMICAL BODY
111
the difference of latitude
112
Measuring the Earths Diameter The astronomical measurement of 48 Measuring the Earths Diameter Triangulation to find the linear dis tance betwee...
113
Foucaults Pendulum Experiment
114
The Variation of Latitude
118
Centrifugal Force caused by Earths Rotation
119
Length of Degrees in Different Latitudes
121
Astronomical and Geocentric Latitude
122
The Earths Mass measured by the von Jolly Balance
125
Falling Bodies
127
What a WedgeShaped Sample of the Earth Might Look Like
131
THE ORBITAL MOTION OF THE EARTH
135
Determination of the Form of the Earths Orbit
136
The Ellipse
137
Equable Description of Areas
138
Aberration of a Raindrop
139
Conical Motion of Earths Axis
142
Precessional Path of the Celestial Pole
143
Precession illustrated by the Gyroscope
144
The Suns Variable Motion in Right Ascension
146
The Equation of Time
147
Position of Pole at Solstice and Equinox
148
Effect of Suns Elevation on Amount of Heat imparted to the Soil
149
The Seasons and the Calendar Exercises References
156
Phases of the Moon
157
The Gibbous Moon before the Third Quarter
158
The EarthLit the Full and the Totally Eclipsed Moon
159
The Harvest Moon A and the Crescent Moon B
163
Determination of the Moons Parallax
164
The Common Center of Mass of Earth and Moon
166
The Moons Rotation
169
Southern Portion of the Moon at Last Quarter
176
Catharina Cyrillus and Theophilus
177
Copernicus
178
Map of the Moon
180
FIGURE PAGE 81 The Nearly Full Moon
181
Exercises
184
Mt Wilson Observatory
185
Size of the Sun compared with the Moons Orbit
189
The Synodic Period of Rotation is Longer than the Sidereal
191
The Rotation of the Sun
192
Paths of SunSpots across the Suns Disk
193
Viewing the Sun
195
SunSpot Maximum
197
Eclipse of January 22 1898 India
211
Pair of Spots on the Sun
212
ECLIPSES
214
The Earths Shadow
215
Lunar Ecliptic Limit
217
Light bent into Earths Shadow by Refraction
218
Moons Shadow on the Earth
220
Solar Ecliptic Limits
222
The Solar Eclipse of January 24 1925
223
The Diamond Ring of the Eclipse of January 24 1925
224
Occultation of Aldebaran March 22 1904
229
A The Eclipse of June 8 1918 Goldendale Washington
230
B The Eclipse of June 8 1918 Goldendale Washington
231
THE PLANETS IN GENERAL
233
The Planetary Orbits
236
Planetary Configurations
237
Geocentric Motion of Jupiter from 1708 to 1720
239
Apparent Motions of Saturn Jupiter and Venus in 1901
241
Path of Eros through Opposition in 1931
242
The Ptolemaic System
244
Antedating an Observation of a Planet
248
Direction of a Planet a
249
Distance of a Planet
252
Relative Sizes of the Planets
258
CELESTIAL MECHANICS
260
Curvature of an Orbit
261
The Law of Equal Areas
262
Linear and Angular Velocities
264
The Conics
269
An Elliptical Orbit
273
Keplers Problem
274
Perihelion Passage of a Comet
277
Problem of Three Bodies
279
Secular Perturbations of the Earths Orbit
283
The Suns Disturbing Force on the Moon
286
The TideRaising Force
293
The Diurnal Inequality
295
Deflection of Light Rays in Suns Gravitational Field
307
References
308
Phases of Mercury and Venus Schematic
310
Surface Detail of Mercury
311
Transit of Mercury November 7 1914
313
Venus
315
Venus in the Crescent Phase
317
Tracks of Transits of Venus
321
Mars From drawings by Barnard
329
Seasonal Changes on Mars
330
Mars From drawing by Lowell
334
Clouds on Mars
338
Mars and San JosÚ as photographed from Mt Hamilton
340
Satellites of Mars
346
The Asteroid Princetonia
349
THE MAJOR PLANETS
361
Jupiter
364
Jupiter
365
Jupiter
366
Jupiter
368
Satellites of Jupiter
369
Eclipses Transits and Occultations of Jupiters Satellites
373
ShadowTransit of Ganymede
374
The Light Equation of the Eclipses of Jupiters Satellites
376
Jupiters Satellites VI VII and VIII
378
Saturn
382
Saturn
384
The Phases of Saturns Rings
386
Saturn From drawing by Barnard
387
Satellites of Saturn
392
Uranus and its Four Satellites
398
Neptune and its Satellite
402
COMETS AND METEORS ORIGIN OF
406
Donatis Comet
407
The Close Coincidence of Different Species of Cometary Orbits within the Earths Orbit
411
Orbits of ShortPeriod Comets whose Aphelia and Nodes are near the Orbit of Jupiter
413
Enckes Comet
416
Halleys Comet
418
Comet 1910a
425
The Tail of a Comet is directed away from the Sun
427
FIGURE PAGE
433
Changes in Morehouses Comet
440
Trail of a Meteor
448
A Rose City Meteorite
454
Principal Elements of the Solar System ji S
471
NUMERICAL DATA i
xvii
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Page 266 - Thus he proposed his law of universal gravitation, which we can state as follows: Every particle in the universe attracts every other particle with a force that is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.
Page 265 - Us foci (ž311). (2) The radius vector of each planet describes equal areas in equal times. (3) The squares of the periods of the planets are proportional to the cubes of their mean distances from the sun ; that is, ti2 : k2 ,• ,• ai3 ,• (h3This is the so-called harmonic law.
Page 399 - Direct your telescope to a point on the ecliptic in the constellation of Aquarius, in longitude 326░, and you will find within a degree of that place a new planet, looking like a star of about the ninth magnitude, and having a perceptible disc.
Page 15 - ... is the great circle in which the plane of the earth's equator cuts the celestial sphere. It is often called the
Page 150 - There are three different kinds of year used, the sidereal, the tropical, and the anomalistic. The sidereal year is the time taken by the earth to complete one revolution around the sun from a given star to the same star again. Its length is 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes, and 9 seconds. The tropical year is the time included between two successive passages of the vernal equinox by the sun, and since the equinox moves westward 50.
Page 100 - Effect on the Time of Sunrise and Sunset. The horizontal refraction, ranging as it does from 34' to 39', according to temperature, is always somewhat greater than the diameter of either the sun or the moon. At the moment, therefore, when the sun's lower limb appears to be just rising, the whole disc is really below the plane of the horizon; and the time of sunrise in our latitudes is thus accelerated from two to four minutes, according to the inclination of the sun's diurnal circle to the horizon,...
Page 161 - This path turns out to be (very nearly) a great circle, inclined to the ecliptic at an angle of about 5░ 8'.
Page 169 - Then again when the moon is rising we look over its upper, which is then its western edge, seeing a little more of that part of the moon than if we were observing it from the centre of the earth.
Page 161 - When the ascending node of the moon's orbit coincides with the vernal equinox, the angle between the moon's path and the celestial ž 1*2] INTERVAL BETWEEN MOON'S TRANSITS. 91 equator is 23░ 28...
Page 265 - The radius vector of each planet describes equal areas in equal times. (3) The squares of the periods of the planets are proportional to the cubes of their mean distances from the sun; ie, tj2 : tú : : ai8 : a23. This is the so-called "Harmonic Law.

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