Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don't Add Up

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Macmillan, Jun 9, 2009 - Mathematics - 176 pages
15 Reviews

Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? The mathematician and bestselling author John Allen Paulos thinks not. In Irreligion he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into twelve chapters that refute the twelve arguments most often put forward for believing in God's existence. Interspersed among these counterarguments are remarks on a variety of irreligious themes, ranging from the nature of miracles and creationist probability to cognitive illusions and prudential wagers. Despite the strong influence of his day job, Paulos says, there isn't a single mathematical formula in the book.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - satyridae - LibraryThing

It's me, over here in the choir robes. Nothing in this book I didn't already embrace, I mean. The geeky mathematical angle was a huge bonus. I found this audio book fun, funny and comforting. If you like this sort of thing, this is the sort of thing you like. And I do. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tnilsson - LibraryThing

Paulos makes some points I have not read elsewhere. And it was worth reading for those. But such points are few. The book is a bit light and I feel that others (such as Dawkins and Hitchens) have done a more thorough job addressing this subject. Read full review

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Contents

I
ix
II
1
III
3
IV
10
V
23
VI
27
VII
34
VIII
44
XIII
74
XIV
83
XV
90
XVI
97
XVII
99
XVIII
106
XIX
116
XX
122

IX
49
X
51
XI
60
XII
71
XXI
133
XXII
142
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

John Allen Paulos is a professor of mathematics at Temple University. His books include the bestseller Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences (H&W, 1988), A Mathematician Plays the Stock Market, and A Mathematician Reads the Newspapers.

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