Queen Victoria: A Personal History

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Da Capo Press, Incorporated, Apr 28, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 576 pages
8 Reviews
In this surprising new life of Victoria, Christopher Hibbert, master of the telling anecdote and peerless biographer of England's great leaders, paints a fresh and intimate portrait of the woman who shaped a century. His Victoria is not only the formidable, demanding, capricious queen of popular imagination—she is also often shy, diffident, and vulnerable, prone to giggling fits and crying jags. Often censorious when confronted with her mother's moral lapses, she herself could be passionately sensual, emotional, and deeply sentimental. Ascending to the throne at age eighteen, Victoria ruled for sixty-four years—an astounding length for any world leader. During her reign, she dealt with conflicts ranging from royal quarrels to war in Crimea and rebellion in India. She saw monarchs fall, empires crumble, new continents explored, and England grow into a dominant global and industrial power. This personal history is a compelling look at the complex woman whom, until now, we only thought we knew.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mirrani - LibraryThing

I found this book at our library's book sale and ran, giddy, over to the cashier and demanded they take my money right away. I love history, I love Ancient Egypt and I was certain I was going to love ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - everfresh1 - LibraryThing

It is a personal history of queen Victoria - as claimed in the title - and it does not cover political background, either domestic of foreign policy. It just is briefly mentioned sometimes. As a ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Christopher Hibbert has written many well-received biographies, including, most recently, Queen Victoria. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and an Honorary Doctor of Letters of Leicester University.

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