To the American Indian

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L. Thompson, 1916 - Indians of North America - 214 pages
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Page 63 - QUAKER 1st Month 2nd Month 3rd Month 4th Month 5th Month 6th Month 7th Month 8th Month 9th Month 10th Month...
Page 104 - ... slaves, flints, white deer skins, fisher skins, otter skins, silver gray fox skins and fine dresses made of dressed deerskins, with fringes of shells knotted and worked in the most beautiful styles, that clink and jingle as they walk and make one have a feeling of respect and admiration for them. The eyes will strain to look on this most pleasing sight, which can never leave one's memory that has seen it in its flowery days. The "festivals are held...
Page 27 - ... spring the young shoots start up from the old roots.... The oak timber they were very careful to preserve, as they gathered the acorns from it late in the fall, October and November. The oak tree furnished them with the staff of life, as it was from the acorn they made all their bread and mush.... All the oak timber was owned by the well-to-do families and was divided off by lines and boundaries as carefully as the whites have got it surveyed today. It can easily be seen by this that the Indians...
Page 49 - The sun to shine by day and the moon to shine by night, to break the awful stillness of this once dark and cheerless world.
Page 25 - ... use the sugar which is taken from the sugarpine tree, and which is a sure cure if taken in time. This made the Indian prize the sugarpine tree very highly, and put to death even a member of their own tribe who harmed a tree in any way. The Indians also took the greatest of care of the hazelnut flats, as the nuts are used in many ways. The nuts were gathered and stored away, as they could be kept for a long time and could be pounded into flour, put into warm water and made a good substitute for...
Page 30 - Bullerton revetment; (10) Osceola and Bullerton dikes. They are distributed over a length of about 20 miles, some on one side and some on the other side of the river. They constitute one connected whole, each one being essential to the effectiveness of the others. The continued efficiency of all is dependent upon the maintenance of the conditions as to approach of the river from above which obtained when they were planned. The order in which they were begun is different...
Page 24 - The Indians were preservers of the sugarpine timber which grew on the high ranges of mountains on the north side of the river, and there was a very heavy fine and also death to the Indian that willfully destroyed any of this timber. The sugar from these trees was also used by them as a medicine in different cases of sickness. The saltwater mussels that they gather which cling to the rocks close to the seashore is an article of food for them, and they gather and eat them while fresh by boiling them....
Page 104 - ... or poor, from any and all tribes, from far off and near by. Far away tribes are looked after, fed and asked to take part in the dance, even if they cannot speak the language. . . . This is the time that the very poor and slave class of our own [Yurok] people are made jolly and contented.
Page 26 - The hazel is used in all of their basketmaking, as the frames of all the baskets are made of hazel sticks. In taking care of the hazel flats, they go out in the dry summer or early in the fall months and burn the hazel brush; then the next spring the young shoots start up from the old roots.... The oak timber they were very careful to preserve, as they gathered the acorns from it late in the fall, October and November. The oak tree furnished them with the staff of life, as it was from the acorn they...
Page 104 - ... allowed, both men and women, to put in whatever they may possess that is of value, that is used to dance with. The wealthy ones that own lands, hunting territory, fishing places, slaves, flints, white deer skins, fisher skins, otter skins, silver grey fox skins and fine dresses made of dressed deerskins, with fringes or shells knotted and worked in the most beautiful styles, that clink and jingle as they walk and make one have a feeling of respect and admiration for them [sic.].

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