Meditations of a Parish Priest: Thoughts

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T.Y. Crowell & Company, 1886 - Aphorisms and apothegms - 213 pages
 

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Page 132 - S'il me fallait les vendre, J'aimerais mieux me pendre; J'aime Jeanne ma femme, eh bien! j'aimerais mieux La voir mourir, que voir mourir mes bœufs.
Page 177 - Since in possessing you, we possess all if we had nothing else, and in not possessing you we have nothing if we had all the rest, oh, my...
Page 78 - There is a frankness which is brutal, and I detest it; a frankness which is indiscreet, and I fear it; a foolish frankness, and I pity it; there is also a frankness which is delicate, opportune, good — honor to it!" — Joseph Roux. "Youth is not rich in time, it may be poor; Part with it as with money.
Page 22 - Je ne trouve qu'en vous je ne sais qu'elle grace Qui me charme toujours et jamais ne me lasse. De l'aimable vertu doux et puissants attraits! Tout respire en Esther l'innocence et la paix. • Du chagrin le plus noir elle écarte les ombres Et fait des jours sereins de mes jours les plus sombres...
Page 44 - A fine quotation is a diamond on the finger of a man of wit, and a pebble in the hand of a fool.
Page 153 - I will be a flower," replies the germ. "I must be a flower. Ordeal for ordeal; 'tis better to suffer in the light than in the shadow; for I suffer here, and I do not find it is true that isolation is happiness. Night surrounds me, the earth oppresses me. Desire, above all, is killing me. I must be a flower; I will be a flower!
Page 87 - What is slander? A verdict of "guilty" pronounced in the absence of the accused, with closed doors, without defence or appeal, by an interested and prejudiced judge.
Page 179 - We call that person who has lost his father, an orphan ; and a widower, that man who has lost his wife. . . . And that man who has known the immense unhappiness of losing his friend, by what name do we call him ? . . . Here every human language holds its peace in impotence.
Page 59 - History, if thoroughly comprehended, furnishes something of the experience which a man would acquire who should be a contemporary of all ages and a fellow-citizen of all peoples.
Page 179 - We call that person who has lost Ms father, an orphan; and a widower, that man who has lost his wife. But that man who has known the immense unhappiness of losing a friend, by what name do we call him? Here every language is silent and holds its peace in impotence.

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