The Return of the Unicorns: The Natural History and Conservation of the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros

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Columbia University Press, 02.07.2003 - 384 Seiten
Beginning in 1984, Eric Dinerstein led a team directly responsible for the recovery of the greater one-horned rhinoceros in the Royal Chitwan National Park in Nepal, where the population had once declined to as few as 100 rhinos. The Return of the Unicorns is an account of what it takes to save endangered large mammals. In its pages, Dinerstein outlines the multifaceted recovery program—structured around targeted fieldwork and scientific research, effective protective measures, habitat planning and management, public-awareness campaigns, economic incentives to promote local guardianship, and bold, uncompromising leadership—that brought these extraordinary animals back from the brink of extinction. In an age when scientists must also become politicians, educators, fund-raisers, and activists to safeguard the subjects that they study, Dinerstein's inspiring story offers a successful model for large-mammal conservation that can be applied throughout Asia and across the globe.
 

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Inhalt

INTRODUCTION
1
Vanishing Mammals Vanishing Landscapes
7
CULTURE CONSERVATION AND THE DEMAND
27
PART II
59
MALE DOMINANCE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS
134
PART III
179
THE RECOVERY OF RHINO CEROS AND OTHER LARGE
226
METHODS
255
DEMog RAPHIC AND GENETIC DATA
275
A PROFILE of RHINoceros behavior
283
REFERENCES
291
INDEX
303
Urheberrecht

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Seite 9 - We must face the fact that the Cenozoic, the Age of Mammals, which has been in retreat since the late Pleistocene, is over, and that the "Anthropozoic" or "Catastrophozoic

Über den Autor (2003)

Eric Dinerstein is director of WildTech and the Biodiversity and Wildlife Solutions Program at RESOLVE. He also leads a team of biologists who help add biodiversity information to Global Forest Watch.

George B. Schaller is vice president of Panthera and has taught as an adjunct associate professor at Rockefeller University, East China Normal University in Shanghai, and Peking University.

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