Independence, Propertylessness, and Basic Income: A Theory of Freedom as the Power to Say No

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Springer, Mar 7, 2013 - Political Science - 241 pages
Independence, Propertylessness, and Basic Income argues that philosophers have focused too much on scalar freedom and proposes a theory of status freedom as effective control self-ownership: the power to have or refuse active cooperation with other willing people, or simply: freedom as the power to say no.
 

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Contents

The Big Casino
1
1 Introduction
9
2 Status Freedom as Effective Control SelfOwnership
25
3 Forty Acres and a Mule? Implications of the Duty toRespect Personal Independence
51
Framing the Issue
73
Freedom and Integrity
90
Market Vulnerability
107
7 What Good Is a Theory of Freedom That AllowsForced Labor? Independence and ModernTheories of Freedom
121
8 If Youre an Egalitarian Why Do You Want to Bethe Boss of the Poor? Independence andLiberalEgalitarian Theories of Justice
144
9 On Duty
171
10 Conclusion
187
Notes
192
Bibliography
217
About the Author
228
Index
231
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About the author (2013)

Karl Widerquist is Associate Professor at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar. He holds two doctorates one in Political Theory from Oxford University (2006) and one in Economics from the City University of New York (1996). He is coauthor of Economics for Social Workers , coeditor of The Ethics and Economics of the Basic Income Guarantee , coeditor of Alaska's Permanent Fund Dividend: Assessing its Suitability as a Model (Palgrave Macmillan), and coeditor of Exporting the Alaska Model: Adapting the Permanent Fund Dividend for Reform around the World (Palgrave Macmillan). He is a founding editor of the journal Basic Income Studies and has published scholarly articles on economics, politics, and philosophy in journals such as Political Studies, Utilitas, Eastern Economic Journal, Politics and Society , and Politics, Philosophy, and Economics .

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