Food and Drink in American History: A "Full Course" Encyclopedia [3 Volumes]: A "Full Course" Encyclopedia

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ABC-CLIO, Oct 28, 2013 - Cooking - 1475 pages
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The expression "you are what you eat" certainly applies to Americans, not just in terms of our physical health, but also in the myriad ways that our taste preferences, eating habits, and food culture are intrinsically tied to our society and history. This standout reference work comprises two volumes containing more than 600 alphabetically arranged historical entries on American foods and beverages, as well as dozens of historical recipes for traditional American foods; and a third volume of more than 120 primary source documents. Never before has there been a reference work that coalesces this diverse range of information into a single set.

The entries in this set provide information that will transform any American history research project into an engaging learning experience. Examples include explanations of how tuna fish became a staple food product for Americans, how the canning industry emerged from the Civil War, the difference between Americans and people of other countries in terms of what percentage of their income is spent on food and beverages, and how taxation on beverages like tea, rum, and whisky set off important political rebellions in U.S. history.

 

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Contents

VOLUME 2
iii
VOLUME 3
iii
Glossary
1441
Appendices
1447
Selected Bibliography
1459
About the Author and Contributors
1475
Index
1
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Andrew F. Smith has taught the history of American food and drink at the New School University in New York, NY, for the past 18 years.

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