The Juvenile Companion and Fireside Reader: Consisting of Historical and Biographical Anecdotes, and Selections in Poetry

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Harper & Bros., 1846 - History - 241 pages
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Contents

Christian Indian
146
Power of Beauty
147
The hospitable African
148
The Orphans Retrospect 101 Two African Chiefs
150
The African Mother
153
Faithful French Servant
155
The Babe
158
The Young Tradesman
159
The Seasons moralized
161
The Faithful Minister
163
The Miseries of War 109 De Salo and the Poor Shoemaker
164
Reason like the Evening Star 111 Anecdotes of honorable Conduct
166
The Path of Life
169
Patron of the Poor
170
Mental Discipline
171
The Gambler reformed
172
What is Hope like
175
A King among Boys
176
Affliction 119 Filial Devotion
179
Sunday
180
Major Andre
181
Paternal Affection
184
Serjeant Jasper
185
Dejection
189
The Dying Warrior
190
The Horrors of
192
American Magnanimity
195
Christian Hope 129 Isaac Haynes
197
Tears of Scotland
200
Lmou Pap 131 Massacre of Miss MCrea
201
Virtue and Happiness
203
An upright Prisoner
204
Address to the Bible
207
Boston Liberty Tree
208
A True Friend
209
The Young Heroine
210
Address to Science
211
Mrs Thomas Heyward
212
Mental Riches
213
Mrs Richard Shubrick
214
Disinterested Poverty
216
The Aged Heathen
217
The Snow Drop
220
Affection and Duty
221
The Infant
222
Royal Magnanimity
223
The Autumn Evening
226
Public Duty and Private Friendship
227
The Fountain of Siloam
229
The Rising Sun
231
The Cottager and her Infant
233
La Fayette and the Queen of France
234
The Grumbling Clown
236
The inexorable Creditor
237
Celestial Wisdom
238
Death of Washington
239
Early Rising
241
Compassion and Forgiveness
242
Baron de Kalb
244
Men mutually helpful
247
Field of Waterloo 24
248
The Murdered Traveller
249
Father and Son
250

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Page 98 - How often have I blest the coming day, When toil remitting lent its turn to play, And all the village train, from labour free, : Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree, While many a pastime circled in the shade, The young contending as the old surveyed ; And many a gambol frolicked o'er the ground, And sleights of art and feats of strength went round...
Page 126 - The dew shall weep thy fall to-night, — For thou must die. Sweet Rose, whose hue, angry and brave, Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye, Thy root is ever in its grave, — And thou must die.
Page 55 - They sin who tell us Love can die. With life all other passions fly, All others are but vanity. In Heaven Ambition cannot dwell, Nor Avarice in the vaults of Hell ; Earthly these passions of the Earth, They perish where they have their birth ; But Love is indestructible. Its holy flame for ever burneth, From Heaven it came, to Heaven returneth...
Page 40 - Happy the man*, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air In his own ground. Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire, Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire.
Page 70 - How poor, how rich, how abject, how august, How complicate, how wonderful, is man! How passing wonder He who made him such, Who centred in our make such strange extremes! From different natures marvellously mixed, Connection exquisite of distant worlds! Distinguished link in being's endless chain! Midway from nothing to the Deity!
Page 32 - Content I live, this is my stay; I seek no more than may suffice ; I press to bear no haughty sway; Look, what I lack my mind supplies. Lo, thus I triumph like a king, Content with that my mind doth bring.
Page 32 - Some have too much, yet still do crave; I little have, and seek no more. They are but poor, though much they have, And I am rich with little store: They poor, I rich; they beg, I give; They lack, I leave; they pine, I live.
Page 118 - The periwinkle trailed its wreaths; And 'tis my faith that every flower Enjoys the air it breathes. The birds around me hopped and played, Their thoughts I cannot measure : — But the least motion which they made, It seemed a thrill of pleasure. The budding twigs spread out their fan, To catch the breezy air; And I must think, do all I can, That there was pleasure there.
Page 99 - The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school...

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