Cycling and Society

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Paul Rosen, Peter Cox, David Horton
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., Jan 1, 2007 - Science - 205 pages
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Cycling is a key everyday mode of mobility in the developing world and parts of northern Europe, and one which is increasingly being promoted by governments of car-dominated societies such as the UK. Yet whilst the complex and hugely valued practice of cycling addresses important issues in social theory including sustainability, healthy lifestyles and urban quality-of-life, it has been remarkably unexplored by social scientists. This book redresses this gap by bringing together an interdisciplinary team of academics with a strong interest in research into cycling. In doing so, it provides an overview of the significance of cycling to contemporary social and political debates and of the diversity of state-of-art approaches to cycling research. The book is divided into main sections: the technology of the bicycle; everyday uses of the bicycle; the cultures of bicycle users; and the spatial dynamics of bicycle use. It throws light on a range of contemporary debates while also substantially extending the scope of cycling studies.
 

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Contents

Figure 1
1
1 and 7
7
NonPlace and the Sensory Construction
25
Womens Professional Cycle
47
An Exploration of Quantitative Analyses
67
Rethinking Transport and Identity
83
The Flaneur on Wheels?
97
Velomobiles and the Modelling
113
Fear of Cycling
133
Gender and Social
153
Bicycle Club 1885
159
in a photo taken from her 1895 bestseller A Wheel
166
Image Identity and Community
179
Index
197
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Dave Horton is Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Mobilities Research, Lancaster University. Paul Rosen is a Research Fellow at the Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York and Peter Cox is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social and Communication Studies, University of Chester

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