Cahokia, the Great Native American Metropolis

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University of Illinois Press, 2000 - History - 366 pages
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This is the story of North America's largest archaeological site, told through the lives, personalities, and conflicts of the men and women who excavated and studied it.
 

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Contents

The Making of a Cahokia Archaeologist
1
The Illinois Archaeological Survey and
2
Prehistory of Cahokia
13
Early Investigations into the Great Mounds
23
The Destruction of the Powell and Murdock Mounds
40
The Hopewellian Ceramic Conference and Digging the Modoc Rock Shelter
50
Chaos and Confusion at Cahokia
57
The 1960s Highway Salvage Program Begins
73
The Second Highway Salvage Project
174
The Struggle to Build a New Cahokia Museum
194
The Slumping of Monks Mound and Discovery of the Grand Plaza
207
Woodhenges Revisited
216
The Physical Landscape of Cahokia
244
The Spiritual Landscape of Cahokia
264
Cahokias Engineers and Builders
274
The Outposts of Cahokia
287

The Emerging Picture of a Complex Cahokia
96
The Excavation of Mound 72
131
Excavations on Monks Mound
154
New Sequential Ceramic Phases Defined
165
The Abandonment of Cahokia
310
Epilogue
325
Index
355
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About the author (2000)

Biloine (Billie) Whiting Young began her love affair with libraries at the age of five in the Council Bluffs, Iowa, Public Library. Her family lived on Bluff Street, only a few blocks from the ornate downtown library and she was a regular visitor. Employment in her college library, where she became more acquainted than she sometimes wanted to be with the Dewey Decimal System, helped pay her tuition. Among her books are Cahokia: The Great Native-American Metropolis; River of Conflict, River of Dreams: Three Hundred Years on the Upper Mississippi; A Dream for Gilberto; and Obscure Believers: The Mormon Schism of Alpheus Cutler. She is also a contributor to the book I Wish I'd Been There: Twenty Historians Bring to Life Dramatic Events That Changed America. Young has four grown children and lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Fowler is a professor of anthropology, emeritus, at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

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