A Grammar of the New Testament Greek

Front Cover
W. F. Draper, 1891 - Greek language, Biblical - 474 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

OCLC: 4646071
Subjects Greek language, Biblical -- Grammar.
LCCN:PA

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ix - ... corrections in more than two hundred and fifty places have been furnished for this edition by the Author. " The NT Index has been enlarged so as to include all the passages from the NT referred to in the Grammar ; and a separate Index has been added, comprising all the passages cited from the Septuagint. The other Indexes have been materially augmented ; the cross-references have been multiplied; chapter and verse added to many of the fragmentary quotations from the NT ; the pagination of the...
Page 199 - ... this diagnosis than will share the hope that psychology will help to cure this malady that Dodds cautiously expresses in the concluding pages. The book is written with a literary skill rare among learned men, and throughout uses consummate erudition to throw light on problems of central importance not only for the past but also for the present and the future. Little noticed at its first appearance and for some time after, it has now for many years exercised immense influence. Many readers have...
Page 470 - ... or any of its cases, precedes the first of the said nouns or participles, and is not repeated before the second noun or participle, the latter always relates to the same person that is expressed or described by the first noun or participle : ie, it denotes a farther description of the first-named person.
Page 83 - ... numerous as almost to exclude the idea of a well-defined law. Buttman ("New Testament Grammar") says:* In reference to the definite article the rules and regulations given in the grammars hold good, so far as in a subject so delicate we can talk of rules. For the endeavor to lay down fixed laws respecting the use of the article many a learned and laborious inquiry has already come to naught ; and the intention ought at length to be abandoned of forcing the use or the omission of the article under...
Page ix - ... among them the Grammars of Hadley, Crosby, Donaldson, and Jelf. Additions and corrections in more than two hundred and fifty places have been furnished for this edition by the Author. " The NT Index has been enlarged so as to include all the passages from the NT referred to in the Grammar ; and a separate Index has been added, comprising all the passages cited from the Septuagint. The other Indexes have been materially augmented; the cross-references have been multiplied; chapter and verse added...
Page 95 - ... rules which have no exception, the inquiry when with several substantives connected by conjunctions the article is repeated, and when it is not. . . . From this fact alone it follows, that in view of the subjective and arbitrary treatment of the article on the part of individual writers (cf. 124, 2) it is very hazardous in particular cases to draw important inferences affecting the sense or even of a doctrinal nature, from the single circumstance of the use or omission of the article ; see...
Page vi - The author makes generous acknowledgments of indebtedness to Winer ; but a slight examination of the book will convince the reader that it has a valid claim to be regarded as an original work. In fact, the general attitude and drift of the two writers differ perceptibly. While Winer — owing, doubtless, to the lax views respecting the NT language which prevailed when he began to write — seems loath to recognize incipient departures from classic usage, Prof.
Page 95 - ... Alexander Buttmann. He says : — " It will probably never be possible, either in reference to profane literature or to the NT, to bring down to rigid rules which have no exception, the inquiry when with several substantives connected by conjunctions the article is repeated, and when it is not. . . . From this fact alone it follows, that in view of the subjective and arbitrary treatment of the article on the part of individual writers (cf. 124, 2) it is very hazardous in particular cases to...
Page vi - Buttmann, on the other hand, is quick to concede and to trace out the general tendency of the language to degenerate from the classic standard, is inclined to give greater prominence than Winer to the influence of the Septuagint, and even to detect traces of the Latin in the syntax of the New Testament.
Page 159 - Greeks, is found not infrequently in the NT ; at any rate, there are numerous genitives that can hardly be reproduced by us otherwise than by means of their corresponding adjectives. In this peculiarity the influence of the genius of the Oriental tongues is unmistakable, for they were especially addicted to this more poetic mode of expression.

Bibliographic information