The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

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T.Y. Crowell & Company, 1902 - 250 pages
 

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Page 26 - ... and reviews of their troops ; never saw a field of battle, or an enemy in battle array. Nor do I claim any particular share of glory in the great engagements with the enemy. We all did our duty, which, in the patriot's, soldier's, and gentleman's language, is a very comprehensive word, of great honor, meaning and import...
Page 4 - I then with the buttend of my fowling-piece rammed the head farther into the throat of the crocodile, and destroyed him by suffocation, for he could neither gorge nor eject it. Soon after I had thus gained a complete victory over my two powerful adversaries, my companion arrived in search of me ; for finding...
Page 180 - English word sire, or sir : and nah, or gnah, knowledge ; because the Scythians united the essentials of nobility and learning together : dna signifies heaven or belonging to the moon, from duna, who was anciently worshipped as goddess of that luminary. And skoohtop signifies the origin or beginning of anything, from skoo, the name used in the moon for a point in geometry ; and top or htop, vegetation. These words are inscribed at this day upon a pyramid in the centre of Africa, nearly at the source...
Page 31 - Sultan's bees every morning to their pasture grounds, to attend them all the day long, and against night to drive them back to their hives. One evening I missed a bee, and soon observed that two bears had fallen upon her to tear her to pieces for the honey she carried. I had nothing like an offensive weapon in my hands but the silver...
Page 190 - Upon my honour," said Kitty, as she was adjusting her modesty piece before the glass, just after getting out of bed, " there is scarce anything I would not give to know what this fudge can be.
Page 117 - ... dismounting; but was prevented by a sudden discharge of musketry from a party of marines that were exercising on the beach; the balls flew about my head, and rattled on the feathers of the eagle like hail-stones, yet I could not perceive it had received any injury. It instantly reascended and flew over the sea towards Calais, but so very high that the Channel seemed to be no broader than the Thames at London Bridge. In a quarter of an hour I found myself over a thick wood in France, where the...
Page 35 - ... pretty strong, placed it, wheels and all, upon my head. I then jumped over a hedge about nine feet high (which, considering the weight of the coach, was rather difficult) into a field, and came out again by another jump into the road beyond the other carriage. I then went back for the horses, and placing one upon my head, and the other under my left arm, by the same means brought them to my coach, put to, and proceeded to an inn at the end of our stage. I should have told you that the horse under...
Page 26 - Bucephalus, put me always in mind of the soldier's and the gentleman's duty ! of young Alexander, and of the astonishing things he performed in the field. We took the field, among several other reasons, it seems, with an intention to retrieve the character of the Russian arms, which had been blemished a little by Czar Peter's last campaign on the Pruth ; and this we fully accomplished by several very fatiguing and glorious campaigns under the command of that great general I mentioned before. Modesty...
Page 129 - ... and the eagle descending on the old tower whence it had carried me on the morning of the day before. It no sooner came down than I threw myself off, happy to find that I was once more restored to the world. The eagle flew away in a few minutes, and I sat down to compose my fluttering spirits, which I did in a few hours. I soon paid a visit to my friends, and related these adventures. Amazement stood in every countenance ; their congratulations on my returning in safety were repeated with an unaffected...
Page 241 - Munchausen should never be said to accept from so gallant a warrior : on which Tippoo instantly discharged his carbine, the ball from which hitting my horse's ear, made him plunge with rage and indignation. In return, I discharged my pistol at Tippoo, and shot off his turban. He had a small field-piece mounted with him on his elephant, which he then discharged at me, and the grape-shot coming in a shower, rattled in the laurels that covered and shaded me all over, and remained pendant like berries...

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