Bulletin No. 1-10: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Division of Pomology, Issues 1-8

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1891
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 104 - For the Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills ; a land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and fig trees, and pomegranates ; a land of oil olive, and honey...
Page 41 - ... 5. — To entitle a new fruit to the award or commendation of the society, it must possess (at least for the locality for which it is recommended) some valuable or desirable quality or combination of qualities, in a higher degree than any previously known variety of its class and season.
Page 41 - Rule 1. — In estimating the comparative values of collections of fruits, committees are instructed to base such estimates strictly upon the varieties in such collections which shall have been correctly named by the exhibitor, prior to action thereon by the committee on nomenclature. Rule 2.
Page 41 - Rule 2. — The society reserves the right, in case of long, inappropriate, or otherwise objectionable names to shorten, modify, or wholly change the same, when they shall occur in its discussions or reports; and also to recommend such changes for general adoption.
Page 41 - In making the necessary corrections they shall, for the convenience of the examining and awarding committees, do the same at as early a period as practicable, and in making such corrections they shall use cards readily distinguishable from those used as labels by exhibitors, appending a mark of doubtfulness in case of uncertainty. SECTION IV. EXAMINING AND AWARDING COMMITTEES. Rule 1. — In estimating the comparative values of collections of fruits committees...
Page 297 - Prune Suisse," but does not discuss their usefulness for drying. In 1854, when scions of "Prune d'Agen" and "Prune Sainte Catherine "were imported by the Patent Office and distributed "principally in the States north of Pennsylvania and certain districts bordering on the range of the Alleghany Mountains, in order to be engrafted upon the common plum," great hopes were held that this region would soon produce an abundance of the cured fruit.
Page 27 - ... expert pomologists whose duty it shall be to supervise the nomenclature of the fruits on exhibition, and in case of error to correct the same. Rule 2. — In making the necessary corrections they shall, for the convenience of...
Page 27 - All articles plaeed upon the tables for exhibition must remain in charge of the society till the close of the exhibition, to be removed sooner only upon express permission of the person or persons in charge.
Page 347 - The variety bearing this name originated early in the present century on a farm adjoining the then borough of York, Pa. The attention of the owner, a Mr. Johnson, was attracted to the tree by the presence of schoolboys who visited it in early spring to get the apples that had passed the winter on the ground, covered by leaves. On securing some of the fruit he found it in fine condition, and when the next crop was ripe took specimens to Mr. Jonathan Jessop, a local nurseryman, who began the propagation...
Page 37 - Plumbs there are of 3 sorts. The red and white are like our hedge plumbs: but the other, which they call Putchamins, grow as high as a Palmeta. The fruit is like a medler; it is first greene, then yellow, and red when it is ripe: if it be not ripe it will drawe a mans mouth awrie with much torment; but when it is ripe, it is as delicious as an Apricock.

Bibliographic information