A Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Scotsmen, Volume 3

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Blackie, 1853 - Scotland
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Page 280 - I know that he is not formally before the Court, but for that very reason, I will bring him before the Court. He has placed these men in the front of the battle, in hopes to escape under their shelter, but I will not join in battle with them : their vices, though screwed up to the highest pitch of human depravity, are not of dignity enough to vindicate the combat with me; I will drag him to light who is the dark mover behind this scene of iniquity.
Page 154 - Which wont in such harmonious strains to flow, Is reft from Earth to tune those spheres above, What art thou but a harbinger of woe? Thy pleasing notes be pleasing notes no more, But orphans...
Page 147 - He is a great lover and praiser of himself, a contemner and scorner of others, given rather to lose a friend than a jest, jealous of every word and action of those about him, (especially after drink, which is one of the elements in which he liveth...
Page 292 - ... from an odd accident. — When about seven or eight years of age, a part of the roof of the house being decayed, my father, desirous of mending it, applied a prop and lever to an upright spar to raise it to its former situation; and, to my great astonishment, I saw him, without considering the reason, lift up the ponderous roof, as if it had been a small weight. I attributed this at first to a degree of strength that excited my terror as well as wonder : but thinking...
Page 298 - This he transmitted to the celebrated Maclaurin, who found it to be very nearly correct, and was so much pleased with it, that he had it engraved. It sold very well, and Ferguson was induced once more to return to
Page 60 - All this could never prevail on him' to part with his beard, but yet in compliance to his majesty, he went once to court in the very height of the fashion : but as soon as the king and those about him had laughed sufficiently at the strange figure he made, he reassumed his usual habit, to the great joy of the boys, who had not discovered him in his fashionable dress.
Page 292 - I then thought it was a great pity that, by means of this bar, a weight could be raised but a very little way. On this, I soon imagined, that, by pulling round a wheel, the weight might be raised to any height by tying a rope to the weight, and winding the rope round the axle of the wheel ; and that the power gained, must be just as great as the wheel was broader than the axle was thick ; and found it to be exactly so, by hanging one weight to a rope put round the wheel, and another to the rope that...
Page 59 - He was bred up very hardy from his youth, both in diet and clothing. He never wore boots, nor above one coat, which was close to his body, with close sleeves, like those we call jockey coats.
Page 292 - ... a rope to the weight, and winding the rope round the axle of the wheel ; and that the power gained must be just as great as the wheel was broader than the axle was thick ; and found it to be exactly so, by hanging one weight to a rope put round the wheel, and another to the rope that coiled round the axle. So that in, these two machines, it appeared very plain, that their advantage was as great as the space gone through by the working power exceeded the space gone through by the weight; and this...
Page 335 - On the search through the house being given over, Lord Pitsligo was hastily taken from his confined situation, and again replaced in bed; and, as soon as he was able to speak, his accustomed kindness of heart made him say to his servant—' James, go and see that these poor fellows get some breakfast, and a drink of warm ale, for this is a cold morning; they are only doing their duty, and cannot bear me any ill-will.

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